Braised Peppercorn Short Ribs

Braised Peppercorn Short Ribs

Details

Braised in red wine and stock and then finished with cream, these peppercorn short ribs are deliciously rich and perfect for the fall and winter season.
  • Serves: 4 to 6
  • Active Time: 1 hr 20 mins
  • Total Time: 14 hrs
  • Views: 56,564
  • Success: 89%

Steps

Step 1: Preparing Your Mise en Place

• 1 medium onion
• 1 rib celery
• 2 large garlic cloves
• 2 small carrots
• 3 sprigs thyme
• 2 bay leaves
• 2 cups full-bodied red wine
• 2 tbsp tomato paste
• 2 to 3 cups dark stock (chicken or veal)

Method

To start this dish, first preheat your oven to 200º degrees Fahrenheit (or 95º degrees Celsius).

To prepare the mirepoix, first roughly chop the onion, celery, carrots and garlic. Gather the thyme and bay leaves. Measure out the tomato paste, red wine and stock. Set everything aside while you prepare the ribs.

Step 2: Preparing & Browning the Short Ribs

• 4 to 5 lb beef short ribs
• sea salt, to taste
• freshly ground black pepper, to taste
• 1 to 2 tbsp grapeseed oil (approx.)

Method

To prepare the short ribs, first trim off any silver skin and excess fat. Liberally season all sides with salt and pepper.

Note: This dish is typically heavy on the pepper, which should be ground quite large. Feel free to use less pepper according to your tastes.

Next, preheat a suitable-sized, heavy-bottomed pot over medium to medium high heat and add the oil. Brown (sear) the short ribs on all sides until nice and golden. Take care not to burn the sucs on the bottom of the pot. Once done, transfer to a plate and set aside while you brown the mirepoix.

Step 3: Browning the Mirepoix

• 1/4 cup brandy

Method

To brown the mirepoix, drain any excess fat from the pot. Add the onions, celery and carrots. Once the vegetables have browned somewhat, add the garlic. Stir and let cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds or so. Then stir in the tomato paste and cook for about another minute.

Next, deglaze with the brandy, scraping the bottom of the pot to release any sucs.

Step 4: Cooking the Dish

Method

To cook the dish, add the ribs back to the pot, meat-side down. Add the wine and top up with stock. The liquid should rise at least two-thirds of the way up the ribs. If it doesn’t, top it up with a bit more stock.

Next, gather the bouquet garni (tie it together with butcher’s string for easy removal) and then tuck it underneath the ribs. Once everything comes to a gentle simmer, transfer the pot to the oven.

Let the dish braise for approximately 3 to 5 hours, or longer if needed. Check the meat periodically and cook until it becomes fork-tender. Cooking times will ultimately depend on the temperature and size of the meat.

Step 5: Cooling & Defatting

Method

Once the meat is fork tender, place the ribs meat-side down in the liquid. Let the dish cool down before placing into the refrigerator. Make sure to prop up one side of the pot to allow the fat to fat pool to one side as it chills.

Once the fat has hardened, gently scoop it off the surface. Reserve the fat to make a roux to thicken the sauce, if needed.

Step 6: Making the Sauce & Finishing

• 1 cup heavy cream (min. 33% milk fat)
• 1 tbsp freshly-ground black pepper
• sea salt, to taste

Method

To make the sauce, first place the braise back into a 200º degree Fahrenheit (or 95º degree Celsius) oven. Once heated through, remove the ribs, cover and keep warm. Remove the bouquet garni as well and discard.

Strain the vegetables and place them into a blender. Add just enough of the braising liquid to blend the mirepoix thoroughly. Return everything to the pot and check the consistency. If the sauce is too thin, make a roux, using a bit of the fat and some flour. Add the roux, a bit at a time. Whisk continuously and let the sauce come up to a simmer before adding more. Keep adding the roux until you reach the desired consistency.

To enrich the sauce, stir in the cream. Finally, season with the pepper and salt to taste. Return the ribs to the pot and warm to heat through. Transfer to a serving dish and garnish with sautéed carrots and thinly-sliced green onions, if desired. Enjoy!

39 Comments

  • Joe G Rouxbe Staff
    Joe G
    Text recipe only at this point. But with the Cooking School Lesson on Braising and combination cooking, it's a breeze.
  • Linda C
    Linda C
    I made this Saturday for some friends. All the flavors come together so well. I even made my own pasta, cut into pappardelle. The only thing I had an issue with were the short ribs I had to buy. There was nothing consistent; I really need to find a butcher. Anyway, everyone was really happy with the dinner, thank you!
  • Sophia K
    Sophia K
    I bought the flanken style that you suggested and they are wonderful. My question is in the oven should I cover the pot? Your video shows uncovered so I am going with that, is there a difference. sophia k.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You need to cover the pot. I highly recommend that you watch the lessons on Moist-Heat Cooking. In particular, How To Braise", as this is covered in topic 7 (no pun intended :-) Good luck!
  • Hesham K
    Hesham K
    This is incredible. I can't get over how awesome the results are and how easy it is to pull off an incredible braised dish. I served this with rosemary and garlic infused mashed potatoes, sautéed purple, yellow, and orange carrots from the farmer's market, and braised pearl onions.
  • Katie B
    Katie B
    This was my second meal that I cooked from Rouxbe and it was heavenly. My husband is still talking about it and it has been a few weeks so--I'll be braising some shortribs again this week for my brother's birthday :) Last time I served this with a parsnip puree (the sweetness was an awesome balance to the dish) and some roasted asparagus. Awesome!
  • Jude O
    Jude O
    PAYS OFF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! There are so many things I "did" wrong with this dish it should have ended up in the trash! I cannot stand the flavor and smell of "crock-pot" (now known to me as mirepoix) braised or stewed stuff. (can't really call it food) Suffice it to say, before I "finished" the sauce it smelled as disgusting to me as the many "stews" my mom attempted and I tried in the "fail-safe" crock pot. But then after reducing the sauce, (which I now know I should have done much longer--but hey! good enough!) like magic it turned into something I never dreamed possible. The aroma, taste, texture, changed. I still cannot fathom how something so nasty smelling/tasting could change into what seems like the essence of angel wings. They were literally singing on my palate. I did about everything you can do wrong with this dish. All I could think of was what was I going to throw together for my family after they tried this monstrosity and wondered where their real dinner was. ...but when my 12-year-old said "OMG! This is fantastic!!!" I nearly fell out of my chair. I mean, I knew how good this was, but to please that little runt's taste buds is a miracle. Love you Rouxbe!!!!!
  • Richard B
    Richard B
    it says "30 hours" but i only count about 5 in total. Is my math bad or are we also counting the making of the chicken stock? Even then i have a hard time getting to 30 hours. Also if I am making the dish the day before do I blend the mirepoux into the braiseing liquid, finish the sauce and then cool OR do I cool the meat and and liquid then reheat then blend and finish the sauce? Much thanks, Richard
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    The total time is taking into consideration the fact that this dish is best made the day before. That being said it can be made in less time but these types of dishes are just so darn good if made the day before :-) The mirepoix in this particular recipe is not blended until just before the sauce is finished; however you could finish it beforehand. If you have not watched it already you may find it helpful to watch the topic from the braising lesson called "Finishing the Sauce for Braising". Good luck and enjoy!
  • Michael W
    Michael W
    The ribs were in for close to 3 1/2 hours at 200 F (about 4 lbs worth) and they definitely didn't fall of the bone. Overall, they were edible, but much tougher that I expected. Is it just a matter of giving it additional time? or did I go wrong somewhere else?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Sounds like they might have just needed more time. While slow and low is the way to go, perhaps next time, if you run out of time you can turn the heat up a bit to speed up the cooking process. Hope this helps. Cheers!
  • Terry F
    Terry F
    If I am understanding this correctly, I can cool the ribs AND the mirepoix until serving day. Then put the ribs back in the oven and use the hot braise liquid to blend the cold mirepoix, and then carry on making the sauce as per the recipe?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Steps 1 through 5 can be done ahead. By allowing the ribs to cool in the braising liquid along with the mirepoix lets the flavors infuse. On serving day, once the fat has been removed from the surface, the ribs and mirepoix are placed in the oven until warmed through. You then remove the ribs from the liquid/mirepoix and keep them warm while you make the sauce as instructed in Step 6. The hot braising liquid is blended with the hot mirepoix that has just been reheated. Hope this makes sense. Let us know if you have any other questions. Cheers!
  • R D
    R D
    I am looking forward to making this again. Very thorough recipe. I now understand some of the cooking terms (combination of herbs in a cheese cloth). Very helpful. Awesome!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Great to hear that you found this helpful. For much more information (the skill and technique behind the recipe) you should check out the lessons in the cooking school under Moist Heat Cooking. In particular, you might want to watch the lesson on Braising. Cheers!
  • Jeanne M
    Jeanne M
    I planned to braise this dish for two to three hours according to the recipe, but it wasn't tender yet. I was able to braise it for about 5 1/2 hours yesterday and then it took another hour today to become tender. Are there certain factors that make braises take considerably longer? My pot may have been a bit overlarge. I have a wonderful 9 quart Le Creuset enameled cast iron pot that I like to use for large pot roasts. The ribs and liquid only filled half of it. Am I doing something wrong, or is this just part of braising? Also, I ended up with a lot of leftover sauce. I put the sauce in the freezer to potentially use for another braise or maybe a soup. What are your suggestions for using up leftover braising sauce? I hate to waste good food. The meal itself was fabulous!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    The cooking times for braising (and any other combination cooking methods) will depend on what temperature the dish was cooked at and the size of the meat. The cooking times in recipes are just merely guidelines, so you did nothing wrong. For more in depth information review the lessons on "Combination Cooking Fundamentals" and "Braising", as we go into quite a bit more detail regarding all of this. As for the amount of sauce, depending on the size of meat used and your pot perhaps you might have added a bit too much liquid. But for sure it can be used with other dishes. I have saved leftover sauce and poured over pan fried meats and mashed potatoes...but it's up to you really. It's just yummy sauce :-) Cheers!
  • Jeanne M
    Jeanne M
    I reviewed the lessons on combination cooking and I have been adding too much liquid. I think, since braising takes as long as it takes, I just have to change my meal planning to do the braising ahead of time so I'll know I can get dinner on the table. I froze my extra sauce, and plan to use it for another braise this weekend or next.
  • Matthew B
    Matthew B
    We made this over the weekend and were very happy with the results. A problem though, is our oven has a lowest setting of 275 degrees. We watched the braising lesson, and observed that the liquid should not be allowed to boil lest the fat emulsify into the dish (I believe that is what the lesson said) and the ribs become tough, Needless to say, our dish was boiling away when checked - any alternatives come to mind - stovetop perhaps? Also, the recipe for the Ancho Cil Short Ribs ribs calls for braising at 350 degrees for 2 - 2 1/2 hours - would you please explain the difference between the cooking temperatures for the same cooking method and same cut of beef? Thank you, Matthew
  • Matthew B
    Matthew B
    "Ancho Chili"
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    While "slow and low" at temperatures around 200F are ideal for combination cooking methods, it is okay if this temperature is higher. What is important it to understand the affect that the temperature has on the dish. Slower cooking produces very succulent results, allows flavors to infuse into each other longer and keeps the myoglobin pigment in the meat (which makes it look nicer). If one is short on time, decent results can still be produced at higher temperatures - it's all about being flexible and understanding what is happening to the meat/dish. This is why some practice recipes show a range of cooking temperatures. Once you have the knowledge, it is up to you at what you want to cook it at. The surround heat from the oven is better than keeping the braise on the stove top where the heat is directly underneath. You could monitor the heat by opening up the oven every hour or so for a few minutes to release some of the heat...but braises do not need to be this much work. Alternatively, you could place the braise into a slow cooker which will keep the temperature low. By the sounds of it, you were very pleased with the results and that is what is most important, so don't get too hung up on the temperatures. Cheers!
  • Stephanie C
    Stephanie C
    I am a newbie here and this is one of the first recipes I have tried. It's a lot of work but I persevered thinking about the outcome. I don't think I cooked the short ribs long enough in the oven at 200* since they were extremely tender but, nonetheless, these were delicious! These tasted as if we ordered them from a restaurant! Well worth the work and the 2 days I took to create this meal. I paired it with creamy garlic mashed potatoes (the mashed potatoes recipe from here where you steam the potatoes - BEST EVER). Next time I am doubling the recipe because I had no leftovers! :)
  • Michael W
    Michael W
    Having tried this recipe twice now, I'd say the recipe should call for 5+hrs of braising at 200F. I realize the time is just a guideline, but I think it will give people a better guide to how much total time they need to dedicate to it. Overall, they turned out great, but slow and low, needs to emphasize the slow a bit more. :)
  • Susan R
    Susan R
    I made this recipe with boneless venison shanks. I made a few mistakes along the way...I should have watched the video again before I did it. That said, I had them for dinner last night and they were great! The venison took about 8 hours to braise, and I probably could have left them in for another hour or so--not sure if that cooking time is due to differences between venison and beef or not. I cooled them in the fridge like directed, but there was no fat at all. The sauce was delicious. My husband is going to leave the bone in next time he butchers, so I'll try it with that too.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Braising does take time, but it's not super hands on which is nice. It's a labor of love :-) Glad you enjoyed the results. You may also want to check out the lesson in the Combination Cooking Fundamentals regarding cooking times and why slower and lower is generally preferred (but it does take longer). Actually all of the lessons in the Moist-Heat Section will provide you with better insight into this type of cooking. Cheers!
  • Johnny H
    Johnny H
    I tried to follow the recipe to the T but somethings went wrong: 1. The Sauce took on a very sharp bitter taste. I used a Bordeaux red wine (it was really cheap stuff). I followed all the instructions. The sucs didn't burn or anything. What could have happened here? 2. The meat wouldn't tenderize. and it dried out. I checked it along the way to make sure it wasnt going to over cook and it remained dry and the whole time. I took it out at 3.5hrs for fear of more drying out. Should I have left it in? Maybe it was poor meat quality. Although I did pay quite a bit for the ribs (they weren't on the bone, does that make a difference?) Anyway, any advice would be helpful because I would like to master this
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    First off, I would really encourage you to watch the lessons called "Combination Cooking Fundamentals" and "How to Braise" (and even the other 2 lessons called "How to Pot Roast" and "Stewing") as these will provide you with some great insight as to what might be going wrong for you. In these lessons we go into great detail about the whole process of moist-heat cooking. We talk about how it is more about what the meat should look like when it is done and not exactly how long it will take to cook. In the end, it's not about following a recipe exactly. Your meat could be bigger, less fatty, too fatty, your sauce could be thinner, thicker, your pot could have bigger, smaller, your oven is not our oven etc etc. Does this make sense? Again, I could go into great detail here but the videos will provide you with better and clearer insight as to what you may possibly be doing wrong. If however, you still have questions after watching those lessons then feel free to ask away. Hope this helps. Cheers!
  • Mark M
    Mark M
    I have only have a 5 quart cast iron pot and was wondering if 4 to 5 lbs would be too much meat possibly. Is the big consideration to make sure I just have one layer of meat and then just adjust the liquid and vegetables as needed? Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    It's hard to say exactly if your pot would be big enough. The best advice I can give is to watch the lesson on "Combination Cooking Fundamentals" as one of the topics in that lessons goes into quite a bit of detail about the size of pot to use etc. You may even want to watch the lesson on "Braising" as well. Good luck and let us know how it goes. Cheers!
  • Kathy F
    Kathy F
    This calls for deglazing with Brandy. Can you suggest a good substitute?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    It really depends on whether or not you are looking for something that has no alcohol or not. But really you could use almost any liquid to deglaze as you are merely trying to incorporate all of those deliciously caramelized bits from the bottom of the pan. You may want to check out the lesson on Pan Sauces (in particular Topic 4 - "Deglazing Pan Sauces" - there we discuss the different things you can use for deglazing). Hope that helps. Cheers!
  • Merna B
    Merna B
    My husband declared that it was as good as at the officer's mess when he was a kid. Now that was a real compliment! The carrots were perfect with this dish
  • Hsiao hui W
    Hsiao hui W
    I've done this last weekend, it turned out very tender and tasty but my husband can only eat half of it as there are still lots of "fat" in the ribs. I got rid of the surface fat as instructed but could not take out the fat within. Can I blanch the short ribs first to take out the fat, then saute and bake? Will this affect the taste in a great deal? Or should I just keep baking longer to 5 or 6 hours so to release most of the fats? Which method is better?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hello - Blanching will not remove the fat, nor will a few hours more of braising. You happened to get ribs with a lot of fat in them - sometimes this happens as each cow is different. I would suggest trying again with a slightly leaner short rib or trying this recipe with a leaner overall cut of beef. Cheers!
  • Hsiao hui W
    Hsiao hui W
    Hi can I make this dish two or three days ahead and leave it in the refrigerator ? If so, is there any adjustment I need to make to keep the ribs still tender and tasty? Thanks!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Most definitely, this dish can be made ahead of time. In fact, we recommend it. For in depth information on what to do, watch the last Topic from the lesson on Braising. Cheers!
  • Eric U
    Eric U
    Would this recipe still work if I were to Pork ribs instead? I cannot eat beef but would still love to try this recipe. Thank you!
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Eric- You can give it a shot but know that the outcome will be different and you may need to fine tune it after a first attempt. I would try St. Louis style ribs or spareribs that tend to have more heft than rib tips. Overall, pork will be fattier and smaller than beef, but it will work. I might cut them 2 ribs thick to help keep more meat intact. Otherwise, you can simply apply the same technique with shoulder (2-3 inch pieces) or some other cut that does well when braised. ~Ken
  • Eric U
    Eric U
    Thank you Ken. I will definitely give it a try and see how it turns out.

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