Popovers | Yorkshire Puddings

Popovers | Yorkshire Puddings

Details

Popovers are similar to Yorkshire puddings only they use butter instead of beef fat, making them lighter and more versatile.
  • Serves: 3 to 6
  • Active Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hr
  • Views: 26,845
  • Success: 100%

Steps

Step 1: Gathering Your Mise en Place

• 2 large eggs (room temp)
• 1 cup whole milk (room temp)
• 1 tsp unsalted butter, melted
• 4 3/4 oz all-purpose flour
• 1 1/2 tsp kosher salt*

Method

Gather all of the ingredients and make sure to let them come to room temperature.

If you are in a hurry, place the eggs into a bowl of warm water. Also, place the milk in its container into another container of warm water. The warm water will speed up the process of bringing the ingredients to room temperature.

*Note: If you want to make these for breakfast to go with something sweet such as jam, add about 1 teaspoon of kosher salt.

When serving with things like Prime Rib or roasts, the full 1 1/2 teaspoons of kosher salt is fine.

Step 2: Preparing the Popover Tin

• 1 to 2 tsp unsalted butter

Method

Rub each of the popover cups with a bit of butter, making sure to lube up the bottom as well.

If you do not have a popover tin as shown here, a muffin tin will work just fine.

Step 3: Preparing the Popover Batter

Method

Before starting the batter, preheat your oven to 400° F (200° C). The oven must be good and hot before you even start the batter.

To prepare the batter, mix everything together in a blender. Run the blender for 30 seconds to a minute. This will create the bubbles that will help the popovers to rise from the steam.

Quickly fill the prepared popover tin about 1/2 to 2/3’s full.

Step 4: Baking the Popovers

Method

Immediately place the popovers into the hot oven and quickly close the door. Do not open the door again until they have finished baking; otherwise, the popovers will fall and/or not set properly.

Bake for approx. 40 minutes or until golden brown.

Note: After about 20 mins or so (after the popovers have risen and set), have a look at them. If they look like they are getting too dark, you can turn the oven down to 350°F (190°C), to finish the cooking process.

Once done, remove from the oven. Using a skewer or small paring knife, make a small slit in the popover. This will allow the steam within to be released. This is important, otherwise the popovers will collapse as they cool.

Chef's Notes

The difference between popovers and Yorkshire puddings is that Yorkshires use the beef fat (the drippings from a beef roast). These popovers are a bit lighter in flavor and you can also prepare them before the roast is even done.

While are best when freshly made, they can be made the day before and then reheated in a preheated 400° F (200° C) oven for about 3 minutes.

Popovers are great served with roasts, but they are also delicious served for breakfast with butter and jam.

NOTE: Make these Dairy and Egg-Free by replacing the eggs with Ener-G egg replacer (equal to 2 eggs) and replacing the milk with 1 cup plain unsweetened non-diary milk. For the butter, use non-diary butter or oil instead.

24 Comments

  • Liz S
    Liz S
    It is really good to know that these can be made a day ahead. I never would have thought to do that so this will certainly make special roast beef dinners easier to prepare. Also never thought to have them for breakfast - thanks for the info:)
  • Liz S
    Liz S
    I made these first thing in the morning and took them out of the muffin tins to cool and covered with a clean tea towel. Then I reheated them on a cookie sheet and they were very hot within the 3 minutes and tasted as if they were just freshly baked. What a great time saver and they were delicious! When I first looked at the 4 3/4 oz of flour I was mentally thinking over half cup. That did not seem right so I weighed the flour and it ended up being over a cup. It seems I am still mentally challenged on volume and weight measures:)
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Glad to hear they worked out well for you Liz. I also made these on Christmas day, along with our prime rib...I have to say the 4 1/2 oz totally threw me for a loop as well :-) Unfortunately, I was in a remote cabin so I did not have the internet to do any conversions...but thankfully I had "texting" ability so I was able to text Kimberley in Edmonton and she figured out that it was about 1 cup + about a tbsp. of flour - thank goodness for friends and modern technology hey!
  • Terry F
    Terry F
    I made these a month ago using a muffin tin. I had some leftover batter so put that into a couple 4 oz ramekins. The muffin tin popovers didn't really pop up much but the ramekins turned out with a beautiful high popped dome. They seemed lighter as well while the ones in the muffin tin seemed a bit tough. I think I got more batter into the ramekins than the muffin cups. Then looked for a popover pan and can't find one anywhere. So,,, any idea why the muffin tin ones didn't turn out and what can I do to fix that?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    If everything was the same in both cases then I am not sure why your muffin tin ones did not turn out well for you. I made these last week using a regular muffin tin and they popped up nicely. I would say try it again or try using another muffin tin. Cheers!
  • Rosemarie A
    Rosemarie A
    I love my popover pans. For those of you who are looking, I bought mine at Williams Sonoma-go in the store or order online. They have a large size, which makes 6 and a smaller size which makes 12. I have two pans of each. I prefer the smaller size. I easily make 12, 24 or 48 depending on the crowd. My family loves them. I also serve these with Prime Rib, but the children often pull out the butter, jam and honey as if I was serving breakfast. These are easy and elegant!
  • Juliana A
    Juliana A
    Hi, could you tell me how does the inside of these popovers look like? Thanks!
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Just googled it and here is a pretty good pic. Cheers!
  • Sue B
    Sue B
    I found it interesting that you do not mention to wait after the batter is made for at least 30 mins for it to "soften". America's test kitchen also says they could see no difference in waiting versus not, but key recies that I have explored all extoll the virtues of letting the batter sit. I do see everything has to be at room temp however. I am curious whether you have any comments on the "letting it sit" issue? By the way, if you haven't discovered Lyle's Golden Syrup (a staple in Britain) as an accompaniment to warm Yorkshire Puddings (Popovers), I HIGHLY recommend it:)
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You are correct, for this particular recipe, there is not waiting for the batter. In fact, the batter is not made until the ingredients are at room temperature and the oven and pan are both hot. For this recipe, which has never let us down, the bubbles which are created from the blender are what help the popovers to rise when baked. If the batter was left to sit, the bubbles would disappear. Hope that helps. Cheers!
  • Sue B
    Sue B
    Ah, the crucial difference being the blender. Interesting. In your comment though Dawn, you mention the pan being hot (prior to pouring in the batter, I assume). That is also what I am familiar with, but it did not say to pre-heat the pan in the recipe here. My popovers did rise well, none-the-less. This is actually inspiring me to carry out some experiments. I have a recipe the flavour of which I believe is more flavourful, although why I am not sure as the essential ingredients are similar. But I have gone from amazing results to hockey puts- it is so variable with it. The differences are in that recipe, not using a blender (which I definitely wil), the waiting for the starch to soften (can one blend after the waiting period? Would it make a difference?), and pouring melted butter into the tins instead of buttering them as in this recipe. For a Brit (which I am originally, these things are important to explore:-) Having said all of that, I love your recipes, which has surprised me as I am 'fussy" and, despite living in North America for many years, still not Americanized in my taste buds. While I enjoy the explorations of America's test kitchen, may or may not agree with their flavor goals and final recipes. Yours, I really generally do! Thank you!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Come to think of it Sue, you are totally right. We did not specify to preheat the pan. In fact, I have never done it, yet they have always turned out perfect for me. Next time I make them I will try preheating the pan to see if it makes a difference. Although I like not having to preheat the pan as it makes it easier to work with, so I might not preheat it. As long as everything it at room temperature, the batter is blended last minute and the oven is preheated, everything should be okay. Cheers! p.s. thanks for your kind words they mean a lot to all of us here at Rouxbe :-)
  • Eric G
    Eric G
    What exactly is 4 3/4 oz? is that four and 3/4 oz?
  • Sue B
    Sue B
    Hi Eric, I am going to jump in here as I am on the site (and you can see I am fixated on Popovers:). Yes, it is 4 and 3/4 oz, but you can check out a discussion above in the post "Worked out super". Dawn mentions it comes out to "about 1 cup + about a tbsp. of flour". Regards Sue
  • Eric G
    Eric G
    Hi Sue, Well I'm showing one cup is equal to 8 ounces. I think some clarification is needed before I try this. Thanks
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Whenever a recipe states a measurement for a solid ingredient (i.e. 4 3/4 ounces flour), you will need to weigh it. An 8-ounce cup measures 8 ounces in volume (not weight). For example, if you fill an 8-ounce cup with feathers and an 8-ounce cup with rocks, they will both fill the cup to the top to create a volume of 8 ounces... but they will vary drastically in weight. There are many threads in the forum on weight vs. volume. Here is one post that provides a link to some common volume/weight conversions. Hope this helps. Cheers!
  • Eric G
    Eric G
    Thank you. Tried it and came out fine. We only have stone muffin molds made of stone ware I think they browned a little too much because of this. So a couple questions here, 1. I would like them to come out fluffier with more "bloom" and a little more egg like. (my favorite way) any idea how I could adjust? 2. Should I put them in the lower half or upper half of my oven? or does it matter? Thanks
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Stoneware may not be the best container to bake these in (I haven't tried it). It might be better to try a popover or muffin tin so the heat can quickly penetrate the batter. Also, place the popovers onto the center rack or lower - you'll need to experiment with your oven. The air that is incorporated and the blast of heat is what will help them to rise to their fullest. Cheers!
  • Debbie D
    Debbie D
    Hi. I'm going to make these this weekend and would like to do them a day ahead. I'm wondering if they should be stored at room temperature or in the fridge. Also, should they be in a sealed container for storing?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    While popovers are generally best made fresh, they certainly can be made a day ahead of time. Wrap airtight and store at room temperature. Reheated in a preheated 400° F (200° C) oven for about 3 minutes. Cheers!
  • Rebecca B
    Rebecca B
    I just tried this recipe for the first time last week. I'm kind of kicking myself for not having tried it sooner. Unlike boxed popover mixes, which sometimes require 1/2 hour resting after hand mixing -- presumably to rest the gluten -- this one comes together instantaneously. I think the texture is quite good. Popovers in a blender --- who knew? The only modification I've tried with this recipe is substituting a teaspoon of barley malt powder for the all purpose flour. I think the malt powder adds just a touch of richness and sheen to the end product, which I quite like. Thanks
  • Janet C
    Janet C
    Ok, so I made these Yorkshire puddings today for Easter lunch with a slow roasted lamb (it's autumn here, and was decidedly winter weather!). My guests included two British folk, including my mom in law, and my friend who is a Yorkshire pudding Connoisseur (she lives near York) so I was feeling the pressure. Everyone marveled at how they managed to stay upright and my friend said it was one of the best Yorkshire puddings she had ever had! Thank you! Happy Easter to those of you who celebrate!
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Wow Janet - What a complement! It sounds like you did a really great job here. I'm impressed that these Brits were so impressed despite the pressure you felt. I knew you can do it. ;) ~Ken
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Wow indeed — I am so glad to hear that your guests approved of the Yorkshire puddings. Interestingly (well at least to me), I lived in York for about a year in my early 20's — but I never did eat (or make) Yorkshire puddings :-)

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