Chicken and Corn Chowder

Chicken And Corn Chowder

Details

Rich, creamy and satisfying chicken corn chowder is so simple to make.
  • Serves: 6 to 8
  • Active Time: 50 mins
  • Total Time: 50 mins
  • Views: 31,754
  • Success: 100%

Steps

Step 1: Preparing Your Mise en Place

• 1 large leek
• 1 large carrot
• 2 ribs celery
• 1 clove garlic
• 3 cups homogenized milk
• 3 cups chicken stock
• 6 tbsp all-purpose flour
• 1 tbsp fresh thyme
• 6 tbsp unsalted butter
• 2 chicken breasts
• 2 1/2 cups frozen corn

Method

To prepare your mise en place, first wash the vegetables and peel the carrot. Finely dice the white and light green part of the leek (save the tough green part for making stock). Finely dice the carrot and celery and mince the garlic.

Measure out the milk, stock, flour, thyme, butter and corn. Gather the chicken breasts and set aside.

Step 2: Making the Soup

• 1 to 2 tsp grapeseed oil
• kosher salt (to taste)
• freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

Method

To start the soup, heat a heavy-bottomed pot over medium-low heat and add the butter. Once melted, add the diced leek, carrot and celery, along with a good pinch of salt. Let sweat until tender and translucent, approximately 10 minutes.

In the meantime, heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Season the chicken breasts with salt and pepper to taste. Once hot, add the oil to the pan and pan fry the chicken breasts, about 4 to 5 minutes per side or until done. Once done, transfer to a cooling rack, tent with vented foil and let rest.

Once the vegetables are tender, add the garlic and cook for a minute or so to release its aroma. Singer with the flour. Temper in the cold milk a bit at a time. Temper in the stock. Add the thyme, season to taste with salt and pepper and bring the soup to a simmer. Let simmer for approximately 10 minutes to thicken.

Add the corn and continue to cook for another 5 to 8 minutes or until cooked through.

In the meantime, shred or cube the chicken into small pieces. Once the corn is cooked, add the shredded chicken and any pan juices to the soup. Stir and heat until the chicken is warmed through. Season again to taste and serve in warmed bowls.

15 Comments

  • Daniel T
    Daniel T
    Hi : Created the corn chowder actually doubled up the recipie and I came out incredible. The only thing was I just need to get it a tad bit thicker. To be honest I started this late and was in a hurry to get it done so when it said simmer for 10 minutes I let it cook for 10 but I probably could have let the mixture heat up a bit more before I started to time the thicking step. Do you think this is what caused my issue?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    It's hard to say exactly what altered the thickness of your soup. It could have been cooking time, the amount of ingredients, the amount of flour etc. You may also want to watch the lesson on "How to Make Starch-Based Thick Soup", as we go into quite a bit of detail on thickening soups. Cheers!
  • Daniel T
    Daniel T
    Tried it again and this time it came out five starts! I would attribute my problem the first time to not letting the soup simmer long enough. Thanks for the awesome lessons and recipe.
  • Andrew L
    Andrew L
    I have been on a soup kick lately and this recipe sure hits the right spot. Yumm!
  • Marilyn
    Marilyn
    Do you think it would be okay if I used non fat milk instead of homogenized milk?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You could certainly give it a try Marilyn. The end result will not be as thick and rich, but with the roux it should be okay (just think that a veloute is made with a roux and either stock or water). Cheers!
  • Marilyn
    Marilyn
    OMG, this turned out so good. I think it was the fresh thyme that made it taste so good. I even used the non fat milk. Thanks
  • Marilyn
    Marilyn
    Because this has milk and stock, what kind of roux is it?
  • Daniel T
    Daniel T
    Hi: A Roux is a Roux, there are no types. The basic definition is: Fat + Flour = Roux (Fundamental Concept) A lot of time you see butter and flour but say you we cooking a turkey the fat can come from the pan drippings. Dan
  • Marilyn
    Marilyn
    I'm sorry what I meant is sauce not roux. Is it a Veloute or Bechamel sauce, because it have milk and stock?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    If you were to use a stock, broth or another clear liquid, such as water, you would be making a véloute, and if you were to use milk or diary you would be making a béchamel. Hope that answers your question. For more information, please see the lesson(s) on "How to Make Véloute" and "How to Make Béchamel". Cheers!
  • Marilyn
    Marilyn
    What if it have both stock and milk, like the Chicken Corn Chowder Soup?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    A sauce suprême is what you'd have. Classically, it is velouté with reduced cream added for richness, but the outcome is very close. I've also seen this done in reverse by starting with a béchamel and adding reduced chicken stock. Enjoy!
  • Yuseph K
    Yuseph K
    Hey, If you were to make a roux based dished, how would you guesstimate the amount of fat to flour to liquid?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Yuseph- For roux based soups, I usually start with around 1 TB fat/1 TB flour to each cup of liquid. You could also use less to start and then add slurry to thicken if you really needed it. For thicker preparations, like sauces or bases, it is more roux to liquid to the thickening power is enhanced. If you;re not using a recipe, it's good to have an idea of the basic parameters. ~Ken

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