Shiitake Broth

Shiitake Broth

Details

This hot and earthy broth is a great shooter option that is delicious with a small poached shitake mushroom, and some spicy cress or daikon sprouts as garnish.
  • Serves: 8 cups
  • Active Time: 1 hr 30 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hr 30 mins
  • Views: 15,323
  • Success: 67%

Steps

Step 1: Preparing the Shitaki Broth

• 8 cups (approx. 1lb) fresh shiitake mushrooms, chopped
• 2 small onions, chopped
• 8 cloves garlic
• 1 4–inch piece of ginger, sliced
• 2 qt water
• 1/2 cup tamari or shoyu
• 1 1/2 cup mirin
• 2 pieces of kombu, soaked in water

Method

First, gather and prepare your mise en place.

To prepare the broth, in a stock pot on medium–high heat add the shitake mushrooms, onion, garlic and ginger. Stir continuously to ensure it does not stick. When it begins to stick, scrape the bottom of the pot while stirring, adding a splash of water occasionally to deglaze the bottom. Continue to cook for about 12 to 15 minutes.

Add the rest of the water and bring to a simmer. Allow to simmer and reduce for approximately 30 minutes. Next, add the mirin and tamari and cook for another 15 to 30 minutes. Lastly, add the soaked kombu and continue to cook for 15 to 30 minutes.

Cool slightly, strain and use as a broth.

17 Comments

  • Rebecca B
    Rebecca B
    Can dried shiitake mushrooms be used instead of fresh to make this broth? Thank you
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    By all means, if that is what you have...Dried mushrooms are very commonly used in place of fresh in many recipes. Let us know how it turns out! ~Ken
  • Rebecca B
    Rebecca B
    Thanks Ken, I'll try the dried shiitakes (3 oz to 1 lb)) for this recipe as this is a more cost effective alternative for me.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    As an experiment, you should try making the broth both ways. The advantage of using fresh mushrooms here is that you can saute them first to develop more color and flavor. That being said, if something is more cost effective and still tastes delicious, then go for it—but it's always good to try it both ways first, so you have a comparison. Cheers!
  • Rebecca B
    Rebecca B
    Ok, I made the shiitake mushroom broth with 3 oz of dried mushrooms and 2 quarts of water. I thought the mushroom flavor was perfect and the final color was very deep. The texture of the broth was luxurious. I really struggled with the sweetness of the final broth. I was wondering if different brands of mirin contain varying quantities of sugar? Do you have a specific brand recommendation for this recipe? I guess the other question, related to the sweetness, is the level of concentration of the broth. When mine was complete, I had just shy of 4 cups (about 3 3/4 cups). The recipe for the shiitake udon soup using this stock suggested 4-6 cups, so I wonder if mine was overly concentrated? What amount of broth should this recipe make? Thanks
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Rebecca- You are on the right track for sure- now it's time to fine tune. Regarding brands - there are hundreds - so just look for dry mirin or read the label and look for a version with little to no sugar. You can also slightly reduce the quantity of mirin if you wanted. Re: volume, it's hard to predict evaporation. Pot size and shape and exact heat will impact how much volume remains after simmering. Simply add a bit more water to cover the ingredients or thin out the concentrated stock with water. I hope this helps!
  • Marian C
    Marian C
    Hello! I understand that miring is probably the best option but can I substitute it with something else? What would you recommend? A sweet white wine? something like seres, or something like a white dry martini?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You are correct in that mirin is quite unique and it best suited when called for; however if you must substitute, you could try on of the following: 1 tablespoon dry sherry + ½ teaspoon sugar OR sherry OR heat two parts sake and one part sugar OR white wine + sugar to taste OR white wine For more information on substitutions, you may want to bookmark the following site called Cook's Thesaurus, they provide definitions, information and substitution for a huge amount of ingredients. Cheers!
  • Rebecca B
    Rebecca B
    I made the shiitake broth again. This time I used fresh, rather than dried, mushrooms. I also reduced the mirin by 1/2 cup. I think that did the trick. The broth had a silky texture, but was quite a bit more toned down in sweetness than the first time. I couldn't really tell the difference in mushroom flavor using the dried versus the fresh mushrooms. If anything, the fresh mushroom broth had a lesser concentrated mushroom flavor. Thanks for helping me sort this out. I think that for my palate, less sweet is better. Thanks
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Good job on testing both the dried and fresh mushrooms Rebecca, and thanks for reporting back the results. Keep up the great work. Cheers!
  • Bonnie D
    Bonnie D
    I am trying the shitake broth this evening and thought i had all the ingredients and only half a cup of mirin so topped it up with Shao Xing wine as it had a similar flavor or aroma. Wondering if that is an acceptable substitute for mirin in a pinch. I will report back on the results tomorrow.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Shao Hsing or Shaoxing rice wine, is a Chinese rice wine, while Mirin is a Japanese rice wine. Mirin is also quite sweet and if often thought of as the sugar element in Japanese cooking. It is used not generally consumed as a beverage, while Shao Hsing rice wine can be consumed as a beverage. Mirin has a flavor similar to a sweet sake. While Shao Hsing has a flavor similar to sherry. In fact, if you cannot find Shao Hsing, a dry sherry can be used instead. Basically, Shaoxhing wine is sharper and more acidic when compared to mirin. Mirin imparts a very subtle flavor, sweeter to the finished product; whereas Shaoxhing, imparts a sharper, winey taste. Hope that helps. Cheers!
  • Bonnie D
    Bonnie D
    The broth turned out well with a small amount of miring and balance of Shao Xing wine (since that is what i had). You mentioned shooter. I love the earthiness of this broth and tasted it cold. It is delicious. How do you see serving such a shiitake shooter? I am thinking of what garnishes would fit with this flavor profile and be a textural balance too. I used fresh shiitake mushrooms for this broth.
  • Chad S Rouxbe Staff
    Chad S
    Hey Bonnie. Yes, this is a favorite broth of mine in the course as well. This would certainly be great warm, room temp or cold as a shooter as you have suggested. As for garnishing, i would leave out any noodles, but you could do a small dice or 1/4 length julienne of the poached shitake, lotus root or water chestnut, and snow peas. Also a nice garnish could be a drop or two of chili oil and a sprig or micro greens of watercress or radish sprouts if you can find them. Yum. I hope that is helpful. Cheers, - Chad
  • Bonnie D
    Bonnie D
    Chad and Dawn, Thanks for the tips and inspiration. Thinking about doing a shooter for my party later in the course. It may be tough to choose which one to make but this one is on the list. As I was thinking garnishes, I thought that finely julienned ginger would be nice or frizzled ginger as a garnish. A poached shiitake mushroom would define it too. Thank you!
  • Lori C
    Lori C
    This recipe is incredible. The broth is so rich you'd almost swear there was fat in it. Thrilled with it. I've modified the recipe somewhat, given the ingredients I've got available but following the spirit of the recipe, I've learned just how adaptable and delicious it is. Thank you Dawn.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Glad that you like it Lori, it is one of my favorite broths as well. I even go so far as to dehydrate the strained mushrooms and other ingredients. I then grind them up into a powder, which I use to add the rice dishes etc.

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