Orange, Cumin, Coriander Vinaigrette

Orange, Cumin, Coriander Vinaigrette

Details

A refreshing and healthy citrus vinaigrette.
  • Serves: 4 to 8
  • Active Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 15 mins
  • Views: 34,432
  • Success: 95%

Steps

Step 1: Preparing the Vinaigrette

• 2 cups freshly-squeezed orange juice
• 1 tsp cumin seeds
• 1 cup cilantro (coriander leaf)
• 1 tsp sea salt
• 2 pinches cayenne pepper
• 1/4 cup grapeseed or olive oil

Method

Juice the oranges. Reduce the juice in a sauce pan set over medium-high heat. Set aside to cool completely.

Heat a small frying pan over medium heat and toast the cumin seeds until fragrant and slightly browned. Once toasted, set aside to cool.

Grind the cumin seeds in a spice or coffee grinder, but not too fine. Transfer the cumin to a food processor. Roughly chop the cilantro. Add the cilantro, salt, cayenne pepper, cumin and orange juice to the blender and blend until smooth. To finish, add the oil and blend for another minute.

Note: Make sure not to add the cilantro while the orange juice is too hot, or it could lose its vibrant green color.

Chef's Notes

This fresh citrus dressing can be served cold as a salad dressing or at room temperature as a sauce.

This vinaigrette will keep for a few days in the refrigerator.

17 Comments

  • Ted D
    Ted D
    I really loved the flavor of this. I've used it on salads that contained strawberries, mango, or peach.
  • Rob H
    Rob H
    I don't see the coriander. How much is required and when is it added?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Really they're the same depending on different regions of the world. In North America, cilantro usually refers to the leaves of the plant and coriander refers to the seeds. Answer to question: In the recipe 1 cup fresh cilantro refers to 1 cup coriander.
  • Rob H
    Rob H
    makes sense, thanks.
  • Romeo G
    Romeo G
    can substitute cilantro with parsley nad put some cilantro seeds??
  • Romeo G
    Romeo G
    sory i mean and not (nad)
  • Joe G Rouxbe Staff
    Joe G
    Hi. You can absolutely make these substitutions but the end result will be quite different. It will have the same color but cilantro seeds (coriander) taste different than chopped up fresh cilantro even though they are from the same herb. Having said that, I bet it will still be great. Keep in mind that parsley a bit more mild in comparison to cilantro, so you may have to adjust the quantities to suit your taste.
  • Tony A
    Tony A
    Hey all, This recipe looks delicious, and I will probably try it soon, but the ratio of acid to oil has me curious. Now let me first say that I love vinegar-rich or acidic vinaigrettes. In fact, I have never been able to make a palatable vinaigrette using the classic 3 parts oil to one part vinegar formula. Most of mine are more like 50 / 50, but usually more on the acid rich side. This goes for pretty much all the vinaigrettes that I make, regardless of the oil that I am using. I know that the whole point of preparing food is to make things that we like, and I usually like my vinaigrettes, but I always feel like I'm missing something because of the ratio. So here's a question: Is the 3-1 ratio designed for flavor (acid) dilution purposes, or for emulsification purposes (to create the right texture)? Or is that wayyyy of base..... Comments and ideas are much appreciated.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Good question Tony, the 3:1 ratio is designed for both flavor and texture. If too much liquid is added then the vinaigrette won't emulsify properly. That being said, you can make a vinaigrette using whatever ratio you like. I am like you, I often use more acid. Besides I am not always looking for a thicker or well emulsified vinaigrette. One more note: the ratio in this recipe may seem quite a higher, as it starts with 2 cups of orange juice, but that does get reduced down. The orange juice is also quite a bit sweeter than something like vinegar or even lemon juice. Hope this helps!
  • Tony A
    Tony A
    Hey Dawn, Thanks for replying. There are a couple things I would like to figure out still. For example, what do you mean when you say "liquid"? It occurs to me that different "acids" will be more or less acidic, and as a result more or less "watery" as well since they are dilutions of acetic or ascorbic (sp) acids for the most part. Is this what you mean? My guess is that "watery" ingredients or more diluted acids wouldn't necessarily help an emulsification.... I was unable to find solid references for the acid content of the average glass of OJ or the average balsamic vinegar, for the sake of a ratio comparison, because they can both vary wildly. I was noting the reduction of OJ in the recipe, and it ends being 1 C of reduced OJ to 1/4 C of oil. How much acid is in that 1 C of OJ compared to lets say, 1 TBSP of a decent aged balsamic vinegar???
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Don't take this the wrong way Tony, but I think you might just be over thinking it. The ratio are just guidelines to give you somewhere to start. A vinaigrettte is meant to be simple and easy. I have been making vinaigrettes for years now and I never think about ratios. I just make them and taste them as I go...adding more or less acid or oil depending on how it tastes. In fact most often I do the more Mediterranean stype of vinaigrette making; meaning that I don't even measure, I just do it right in the salad and taste it as I toss it. I say don't get too hung up on whether a liquid (or acid) is more watery than another, just get in there and start experimenting and have fun with it! Cheers p.s. You may also find it helpful to watch the Rouxbe Cooking School Lesson on How to Make Vinaigrettes.
  • Bentley B
    Bentley B
    I tried this dressing on Friday. The orange-cumin (and cilantro) combo is amazing...another peanut butter and jelly moment! Maybe this flavour combo could be used in a sauce for chicken...
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    For sure this could be used with chicken or even fish. Glad you liked it - cheers!
  • Jorge A
    Jorge A
    The recipe is "Orange-Cumin-Coriander..." but nowhere in the ingredients I see Coriander? Did I miss something
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    See the comment near the top of this thread...Cilantro vs. Coriander. Cheers!
  • Omar E
    Omar E
    I know that vinaigrettes are versatile and can be used as marinades. Would you recommend any adjustments in ratios if I used this (or any other) vinaigrette as a marinade for chicken. Thank you, Omar
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    It really depends on the marinade; however I am sure most, like this one, can be used as is. Cheers!

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