Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Details

Chewy, chocolaty and super delicious. Need we say more?
  • Serves: 2 dozen
  • Active Time: 15 mins
  • Total Time: 30 mins
  • Views: 201,466
  • Success: 94%

Steps

Step 1: Making Chocolate Chip Cookies

• 3/4 cup unsalted butter* - (6 oz or 170 g)
• 1/2 cup white sugar
• 2 tsp vanilla extract
• 1 whole large egg
• 1 large egg yolk
• 2 cups all-purpose flour
• 1/2 tsp baking soda
• 1/2 tsp Fleur de Sel (or 1/2 tsp regular salt)
• 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
• 1 to 2 cups chocolate chips**

Method

Preheat the oven to 325° degrees Fahrenheit.

Melt the butter then allow to cool to room temperature. Using a large bowl, cream together the butter, brown sugar and white sugar on high speed.

*Note: For cookies with a chewier texture, melt the butter and let cool slightly. Use a wooden spoon to mix the cookie dough together. A mixer incorporates more air into the dough, which will give the cookies a cake-like texture.

Next, add the vanilla extract, egg, egg yolk and beat until smooth. Sift the flour and baking soda together. Stir in the salt. Add the dry ingredients and mix on low until everything is incorporated. Fold in the chocolate chips.

**Note: The amount of chocolate chips you use depends on how chocolaty you want the cookies to be. Some people find 2 cups of chocolate chips a bit too much.

Line a baking tray with parchment paper or spray with non-stick spray. Using a large soup spoon, form equal size rounds of dough (or use a small ice-cream scoop). Make sure to leave enough space between each cookie as they will spread out a bit as they bake. Refrigerate for fifteen minutes before baking.

Bake the cookies for 13 to 15 minutes or until the edges turn a light golden color. Once done, cool for a few minutes before transferring to a cooling rack. Allow to cool completely before serving.

Chef's Notes

I like to make the cookie dough, form it into balls and freeze it. Then I have fresh homemade chocolate chip cookies ready at the drop of a hat!

There are a few things that make these cookies different, using Fleur de Sel instead of regular salt gives them a really nice sweet and savory contrast. Also using cooled, melted butter rather than just room temperature butter makes them a bit chewier.

157 Comments

  • Garth T
    Garth T
    You can't go wrong with this classic. Well done.
  • Anita S
    Anita S
    I followed this recipe exactly, and the cookies turned out perfect. Definitely the best chocolate chip cookie recipe I've tried, though next time I may add nuts.
  • Jen M
    Jen M
    I was on the search to find the best chocolate chip cookie recipe as I am going to become a mom soon, and everybody knows that moms make the best cookies in the world. My search is over, this are the best cookies ever!! Thanks Dawn =D and happy Mother's Day to all the moms!!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Adding a cup of oats adds a bit of crunch to these already yummy cookies. I tried an experiment with these cookies. I substituted one cup of flour for one cup of instant oats...I got oatmeal chocolate chip pancakes. Don't get me wrong they were delicious, but not that pretty. For the best results keep the recipe exactly the same and just add 1 cup of oats and bake as usual.
  • Ruth B
    Ruth B
    I followed the recipe exactly and had a nice thickish, chewy-in-the-centre, cookie. I did have to bake them 20 min. instead of the 15 min. likely due to different oven, but they looked exactly like the video picture and are (were, ha-ha) delicious!
  • Leah P
    Leah P
    Well, my attempt to melt Earth Balance resulted in my batter not being thick and beautiful like Dawns, but soupy and dark brown. I had to start over, and learned that nothing tastes like the real deal... like the real deal. These were really, really good. I couldn't find Fleur de Sel though at my grocery store. Would I need to buy it somewhere specific?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You can buy Fleur de Sel at specialty grocery stores and gourmet markets. Although these cookies are perfectly yummy with regular salt! Watch Video: What is Fleur de Sel?
  • Debra G
    Debra G
    Always searching for a great chocolate chip cookie. I thought these were terrific. Good mix between a little crispy and a little chewy.
  • April A
    April A
    After reading everybody's comments and watching the video on how to bake chocolate chip cookies, I couldn't wait to bake such delicious cookies for my family. But the thing is, after I baked my cookies and left them to cool, they became rock hard!! They were way too sweet and so hard they were hardly edible! Did I do something wrong? I followed the recipe step by step! Can anybody tell me what happened?
  • Jen&francis D
    Jen&francis D
    So whilst I was mixing the ingredients for these cookies I 'removed' my blouse, then my husband came home and well....the cookies were still fantastic, although they were left in the oven a bit too long....:-) FYI, they're a great snack for after a workout!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Perhaps the cookies were left in the oven a touch too long. I have made these cookies more than I care to mention and they have never turned out hard. In fact they are always soft and chewy. Be sure to bake them just until they start to get a bit of color. When done they almost look like they are under cooked, just a touch of golden on the bottom and a bit on top. Also be sure the oven is only at 325°F. As for the sweetness, no one has ever said they are too sweet. They are chocolate chip cookies after all. But you could try using less chocolate chips if you like. Or try using bittersweet chocolate chips rather than semi-sweet, this will eliminate some of the sugar. Which Chocolate Chip to Use? I hope this helps, we appreciate the feedback and would also like to hear if this has happened to anyone else. We only want the best recipes for you. Thanks and Good Luck!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Make these cookies and make them fresh, so the chocolate chips are still soft. I showed up to an appointment the other day with a big plate of these and you would have thought that I bought everyone a car. What a great feeling!
  • Lily T
    Lily T
    Hi Dawn I left the melted butter on the counter top for about an hour, however, it never reached the consistency that you have in the video. So when I mixed the sugar in, I ended up with this soupy mixture. It was okay after I added the flour in, but the consistency of the batter was nothing like yours. I refrigerated the batter for about 15 mins before baking, but the the cookie spreaded out too much when it was baking. Also the chocolate chips didn't pop out of the cookie. Any advice on that?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    The butter needs to be actually melted (in a pot, or microwave and not just left at room temp.). This is what makes the chocolate chips pop out. Refrigerating them is a good idea as well (as you did). Next time try melting the butter, let it cool and then proceed. These really are yummy cookies I make them all of the time. In fact I always have a bag in the freezer just in case. Good Luck!
  • Winnie T
    Winnie T
    Hi Dawn, This recipe looks really great and simple to do. However, I do have some difficulties with getting the butter the same consistency as it is in the video. When I melt it in a bowl in the microwave, it just looks like oil, even when cooled. Like this picture here. http://www.dkimages.com/discover/previews/917/748957.JPG So I try to cool it off in a cooler place like the fridge, but then it turns icy-like. Although, I was only testing a very small portion, to see if the butter would come out the same. Maybe I just needed to melt more at a time? Am I supposed to heat the butter on a higher heat until it bubbles, or something else? A little help, please? Thanks, Dawn!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    The butter is melted but it did sit at room temperature for a little while. Just as long as the butter is not hot. I usually forget to melt the butter in advance so I end up melting it in the microwave and then I pour it into a large bowl and let it cool for a few minutes. Then I add the sugar and put the whole thing in the fridge for about 15 minutes before I begin.
  • Winnie T
    Winnie T
    Ahh... okay. So it's just supposed to be just melted, then stop. Don't get it all hot, eh? Alright, thanks so much, Dawn. I've already purchased my ingredients. Will make them tomorrow. :)
  • Eunice M
    Eunice M
    hi Dawn i was just curious as to why baking soda instead of baking powder? i was always under the impression that baking soda needed an acid to react to. BTW i really do love this recipe as i love the crisp exterior and the oozing soft interior. thank you
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Recipes that use baking soda for leavening always have an acid somewhere. It might be obvious, such as vinegar, lemon juice, sour milk or buttermilk. But the acid could also be hidden- for example honey and molasses are acidic. For our recipe we used brown sugar which has molasses in it.
  • Eunice M
    Eunice M
    thank you Dawn could i bother you a little bit more and ask what would happen if we used baking powder instead? and by that i mean what is the "scientific" explanation? i like to futz my recipe and adjust it according to how i perceive a recipe should be and knowing the reasonings is immense help. without your info regarding the acidity of honey and molasses, who would have known? thank you very much
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    The amount of baking soda used in a recipe is just enough to neutralize the acids present in the recipe. If more leavening power is required, baking powder can be added – not more baking soda. Too much baking soda will cause a soapy taste. However, both used in excess can give bad flavor, texture, and color to baked goods, so just be careful when tweaking recipes.
  • Reggie  R
    Reggie R
    This was my 2nd recipe with you guys.. These cookies were soo tasty I had to make two batches. I did one plain and then went back and experimented with using nuts and used a 1/2 cup of partially cooked oats. Both batches turned out perfect. I tend to like my cookies a little bit on the crunchy side so the last 2mins I cranked up the heat to 350. They were completely crunchy with just the upper layer being soft and chewy. Rouxbe does it again. Thanks Dawn.
  • Jen H
    Jen H
    Is it acutally necessary that you melt the butter, let it cool to room temp., assemble everything together THEN put it in the fridge? In most recipes I've tried, we just leave the stick of butter at room temp. for half an hour, then we just cream with the sugars. I would think the method I know would help prevent the cookies from spreading so much.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You are correct that most recipes just let the butter come to room temperature, but melting and cooling the butter gives these cookies that extra touch. I have tried making them without melting the butter and they are still good, but they are just that much better when I melt the butter. It adds a bit of crunchy-ness and chewy-ness at the same time. It's up to you though, try experimenting and see which way you prefer it. Thanks dawn
  • Pooja M
    Pooja M
    My cookies tasted amazing! But were pretty hard... some how my cookie dough was not as moist as shown in the video, even though the flour quantity used was the same around 450 grams once u convert. Also i had to cook them for longer because the batter was still raw, it was sticking to the baking dish. what did i do wrong??
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Happy to hear your cookies tasted good, but sorry to hear they were a bit hard for you. It maybe sounds like they were just baked a bit too long. Just a few questions, did you spray or line your cookie sheet with something? And how "raw" was the batter when you originally wanted to take them out of the oven? Also, did you refrigerate the dough before baking the cookies? Try not to give up on these cookies, they really are delicious...I suppose there are worse things to have to experiment with hey! Good Luck
  • Pooja M
    Pooja M
    Umm.. I didnt use a cookie sheet i just sprayed the dish with Pam cooking spray. The batter was quite raw after 20-25 mins of baking cause when i tried to remove the cookie from the baking dish a large chunk of the cookie broke off and remained stuck to the dish. My batter was dry should i try putting in less flour? and i did refridgerate then for 15 mins before baking. Also, my cookies wouldnt become as flat as yours they just inflated and stayed like that! help!
  • Jurie H
    Jurie H
    They turned out pretty good. Crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside. Notes: - I had trouble folding in the chips, I will use 1.5 cups next time. - The dough was slightly less smooth than in the video, might be the size of the eggs. - I had to bake them for over 15 minutes.
  • Marcelo B
    Marcelo B
    I just baked these off and they were fantastic. Even though I am a chocoholic, I added just over a cup of chocolate chips and they were still incredible. Thanks for the recipe.
  • David P
    David P
    It's called a CHOCOLATE CHIP cookie. The objective above all else, is to achieve a deep and rich chocolate taste, not necessarily overly sweet, but a truly delightful chocolaty treat. From my experience, the best chocolate baking chips are Ghiardelli 60% cacao bittersweet chocolate chips. Nestle' chips suffice is your making cookies for the kids, but if your making cookies as a gift or for adults with a more descerning palate, then Ghiardelli chocolate is the premuim grade chocolate you will want to use. Dawn said it best, the better the chocolate, the better the cookie will taste. This is the perfect recipe to use premium Ghiardelli chocolate with.
  • Veena A
    Veena A
    I make chocolate chip cookies almost every week - its my family favorite. My kids can eat them every evening for snack. I've tried various recipes - from more sugar to fat free - but by far this has been the best recipe ever. I personally avoid this recipe bec it has an extra egg yolk as well as more chips but having said that... its still my favorite recipe. Thanks a lot.
  • Naouar E
    Naouar E
    I made these cookies for the first time and they were delicious! What if I want to get crunchy cookies? What should I change to the recipe?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Hi Naouar, You can try making these few small adjustments: - cream the butter and sugar together very well - use only 1 whole egg (and not the additional yolk) - instead of having mounds of dough, shape each scoop into rounds and flatten them out prior to baking - lower your oven temperature to 300 degrees and bake the cookies long enough so their moisture evaporates We haven't tested this, so let us know how it turns out. In general, cookies that have high sugar and fat content with low amounts of liquid will be crispy. If they are shaped small and thin, they will tend to dry out quickly during baking and have a crispier texture. It can sometimes be tricky to adjust baking recipes. Good luck!
  • Stefania S
    Stefania S
    All my friends, colleagues and relatives are asking me where I got the recipe for these gorgeous cookies.... They just adore them. Thanks a lot guys!
  • Lise K
    Lise K
    After making the cookies for the third time, I have ended up with this: 1. Reduce the amount of sugar with 1/8 cup 2. Use chocolate bites, you don't need to buy chips (they're actually more expensive by the pound). 3. Reduce the amount of salt to half 4. Add 1/3 cup of crushed hazel nuts I think the cookies are really good originally, so this is just how I prefer them.
  • Debra G
    Debra G
    I have successfully made these cookies before, but this time they are spreading flat. Only difference, I am tripling the recipe. I melted the butter and let sit for an hour until cool. I am in the midst of baking my favorite cookies for a cookie exchange. Can I do anything? Chill them longer? Add flour? What can I do to reduce their spreading?
  • Joe G Rouxbe Staff
    Joe G
    If your batter is really cold, they should set (from the egg) before they go flat. Make sure your oven temperature is also set right. If too low, it will melt the butter before the egg has time to set the cookie. Also, make sure to just drop the batter onto the cookie sheet and not flatten them. Hope that helps.
  • Debra G
    Debra G
    I can't figure it out! The batter is really cold now, oven temp is correct, and I'm dropping the batter on the cool cookie sheet. Anything else I can do, I have a LOT of batter left!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Perhaps this is a case of tripling the recipe in baking where it doesn't work. Baking is finicky and sometimes it just doesn't work to triple or increases batches. Sometimes mistakes are made when measuring and sometimes it's just the nature of baking. Here are my suggestions to "save the batter": 1. first off - don't worry...they will still be delicious...even if they are flat (just tell people that's how they are supposed to be). 2. try baking a few of them from frozen to see if this helps. 3. if that doesn't work...try turning the oven up to 375°F and bake a few at that temperature. Hope this helps...we are here if you have anymore questions! p.s. one of my favorite coffee shops bakes really flat choc. chip cookies and they are yummy!
  • Debra G
    Debra G
    Thank you Dawn and Joe for your speedy replies. I tried increasing oven temp, freezing batter, and they still aren't their normal consistency. Better, but not as I've made them in the past. I would guess it is a tripling thing- or somehow I measured something incorrectly. They still taste good. But, I think I will give them ALL away in the exchange and make a new single batch for my family tomorrow. :-)
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Just sorry we couldn't have been more help. Sounds like you have the right attitude though. I could sure go for a chocolate chip cookie right now...flat or fat! :-)
  • Linda C
    Linda C
    I made these cookies today. they are the best cookie I've ever made. I read all the comments, and they really helped me understand. I followed the recipe exactly...I'm not a baker, but I really want to be, so I did not deviate from the recipe...I used really good chocolate chips, Ghirardelli, although they were bigger than what I've used in the past, I decided to follow the recipe...well, I still can't believe what a difference following Dawn's instructions made. No more of the quick, that's get this done. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you...they are coming with me to a Superbowl party...go Steelers!!!
  • April J
    April J
    Hi, I just made these cookies and they are great! The best I have ever made. However, I did not achieve the perfection in the video. My cookies are noticeably smoother and flatter, and the chocolate chips are hidden inside and do not pop out. I made so many mistakes because I didn't watch the video again as I was baking the cookies. My first mistake was adding an extra egg white by mistake instead of the yolk! I guess I am not used to adding yolks to recipes, only whites. I also tend to rush when prepping my ingredients. My next mistake was melting the butter until it was hot and translucent yellow instead of warm but cloudy and creamy. Because of this, after cooling, it was still liquid. I think maybe it would be really helpful show show people the proper consistency to melt the butter in the video. I also froze the dough in the mixing bowl before balling it up, for only about 5-10 minutes, and I am wondering if that's okay. I just didn't have room in my refrigerator for two cookie sheets, but my freezer had a nice spot that would accommodate the mixing bowl. My next question is how should I store chocolate chip cookies? Do they need to be refrigerated, and if so, how long until they should be put in? I am still finding my way around the kitchen, at 37, but I am a quick study. I am somewhat technical and I have found that cooking and baking allows me to be extremely technical while also being creative. It has become my newest hobby. I just love the site and all the helpful videos. And your Canadian accent is delightful, Dawn! Thank you!
  • Joe G Rouxbe Staff
    Joe G
    Regarding the somewhat flatter cookies, I'd say you have already figured this out. Extra liquid could be one reason. The other reason is that you froze the whole batch of batter in bowl. You will get better results if you form the cookie dough into balls (like the video), before freezing (rather than in the bowl). What happens when cooking is that the butter in the dough will start to melt and then the egg (protein) will set the cookie. By freezing, the cookie won't have enough time to fully flatten before setting leaving you with that "chunky" look. By contrast, if you cooked the cookies in a low temperature oven, they will go fully flat before setting. As for storing, an air tight container in the refrigerator will be best if you plan for the cookies sitting around for a few days (never seen this happen here :-)...
  • Paddy L
    Paddy L
    They're so good, they passed the ultimate taste tester in this family - my 23-year-old nephew Tom declared them delicious! I melted the butter, but it refused to re-solidify, even after leaving in on a cool shady windowsill and putting it in the fridge, so I added it as is. I didn't see much difference in the cookies I chilled before baking and the ones that went straight into the oven. On the whole, though, this is a recipe I shall definitely keep and make again.
  • Dara M
    Dara M
    Where's my glass of milk? These cookies look chewy and so fulfilling. If I'm going to eat a chocolate chip cookie, it has to be good. These look as though they would fit the bill perfectly!
  • Natalie N
    Natalie N
    Is it possible to substitute the brown sugar by white sugar and use only white sugar for the cookies? As far as I understand, because of that the baking soda would have nothing to react with so that's not good. But still. Maybe I can use white sugar and baking powder?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    You could use all white sugar in this recipe, but the texture of the cookies will change. Not only will they become crispier, they will also become sweeter. The moisture in brown sugar produces chewier cookies and makes baked goods softer and more tender than those made with white sugar. The baking soda will help the cookies to rise a bit more too. You could use only baking powder (as high as 2 teaspoons), but more than necessary will alter the flavor of the finished product by giving it a metallic flavor. Unless there is a reason for not wanting to use brown sugar and baking soda, I'd stick to the recipe, as these cookies are delicious and have a wonderful texture as is. Hope this helps!
  • Lauren K
    Lauren K
    Truly the best choc chip cookie recipe I have found, and I have tried many! I use sea salt and all brown sugar with wheat pastry flour and milk chocolate chips. My husbands reaction when he tried them right out of the oven is too profane to post :) He loved them!
  • Patricia S
    Patricia S
    Like others have been saying, this probably is the best choc chip cookie I've had. The thing I noticed was the amount of vanilla ... 1 Tbsp as opposed to the normal 1 tsp most recipes call for. I love that! They smelled terrific baking too!!
  • Linda C
    Linda C
    I made these cookies for my niece's wedding. I had so many people come up to me and ask why these cookies tasted so different. It was the Fleur de Sel. That lovely chocolate, salty taste is just the best. thank you Rouxbe, I've opened many eyes!
  • Alvin B
    Alvin B
    I have made this recipe a few times, but today was the first time using Fleur de Sel. Very nice. Subtle, but very nice. This has become my go-to chocolate chip cookie recipe. Many thanks, Dawn!
  • Cydney C
    Cydney C
    I recently found out I have celiac disease (allergic to wheat / gluten). This recipe is my FAVOURITE cookie. I am trying to make the cookies with the substitute of an all-purpose rice flour (Kinnikinnick brand) for the regular flour. The cookies did not turn out. They became flat as a pancake and crispy. Any suggestions or help with gluten free baking? Thank you!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    I am not an expert at gluten-free baking, but I do know that most often you cannot just simply substitute another flour for all-purpose flour. Here is a really good recipe for some Gluten-Free Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies. The recipe calls for almond flour. Hope this helps!
  • Julie B
    Julie B
    I live at 8600 feet and often have to play around with a recipe before it will cook right. Modifications include a higher temperature, less butter (or less sugar), and add moisture. I have a recipe for chocolate chip cookies and I cook at 375 degrees add 2 Tablespoons of water and reduce the butter by 2 tablespoons (the recipe calls for 1 cup). What modifications would you suggest for this recipe?
  • Michelle G
    Michelle G
    Great cookie.Just made a batch and they are perfect..Question: Can you freeze most cookie doughs like you suggest doing for this recipe? I hope you say yes because I'm impulsive and without waiting for an answer put a batch of unbaked snickerdoodle cookies in my freezer. I plan to bake them from a frozen state at the same temp they bake unfrozen. Think this will be OK? Thanks
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Yes, I believe that most cookie doughs can be frozen. I have frozen snickerdooles before and they baked up just fine.
  • Tony M Rouxbe Staff
    Tony M
    Complex question, Julie, for us to answer at this time, just like modifying recipes for diabetes is complex yet quite real and valid. However, my suggestion is seeking out cookbooks that deal with altitude cooking - I'm sure there are some good ones out there. From the top of my head, even Joy of Cooking talks about some general rules, but only general ones. I'm sure there is clearer information out there from sources that have tackled this issue for regional/practical reasons. But I like the fact you offer our forum a suggestion already. Go one step further, try YOUR modifications (note plural, for that's what cooking is all about - going to the drawing board more than once) and post the results. Rouxbe users can be teachers as well as users. As a teacher I often encourage my professional students to TEACH ME something I don't know. Let me know your results.
  • Lucy F
    Lucy F
    I love these cookies as is but was wondering how to turn this recipe into oatmeal cookies? If I add rolled oats, what other changes should I make? Thank you in advance.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Here is a recipe for Oatmeal Cookies. Other than that you can try adding some oats to this recipe, but I have not tried this myself.
  • Julia K
    Julia K
    I can not figure out how to get the butter consistency that you did. My turned into liquid and never solidified at all so my batter was liquidy too. How do I make it cool to the consistency in the video? Thanks!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    There are a few other comments about this same issue. You may want to read the other comments as well. I think that you just need to let the butter cool a bit or make the cookies and then refrigerate them for a bit. This will solidify the batter a bit, so they don't spread out as much when they bake. Hope this helps! Don't give up, these are delicious cookies.
  • Norma M
    Norma M
    If I know that I'm going to be baking cookies the next day,I usually set the butter out on the counter and let it thaw out,I keep my butter in the freezer or even in the fridge.I know that if I use the microwave to melt it down it just gets too watery. Leaving it sit out for the day is just perfect.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Just to be clear, this recipe calls for "melted butter" not just room temperature butter. Either can be used, it is just important to know that the results will vary slightly, if using one or the other. Melted butter gives these cookies a slightly chewier texture. Cheers!
  • Alison S
    Alison S
    I've been using this recipe for quite some time. The only difference in my recipe is that it calls for 1 cup of brown sugar. I actually found that by using 6 oz. of margarine and 6 oz. of butter, the cookies are much prettier and smoother looking. I found this out by accident when I was short on butter one day. Someone mentioned above that the chips were hidden inside and didn't pop out. I always keep out a handful of chocolate chips to place on top of the balls of dough before baking. Thanks for the suggestion of using Fleur de Sel - I will have to try that next time! These are definitely one of my go-to chocolate chip cookie recipes! Everyone loves them!
  • Meme D
    Meme D
    Delicious.
  • Travis D
    Travis D
    Hi, Does the quality of the chocolate chip effect the end result. Thanks.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Yes quality does make a difference, as discussed earlier in this thread There is also a quick tip or drilldown video in step 1 of the video that talks a bit more about chocolate chips. Cheers!
  • Mike R
    Mike R
    Great recipe but I struggle with some of the conversions to metric. How much does a cup of chocolate chip weigh in grams? I have the same problem with the sugar and flour. Please could you give me an idea, and maybe add the conversions to the recipe? Thanks, Mike
  • Mike R
    Mike R
    Addendum: forgot to say, I don't use chips because here in the UK they tend to be lower quality. I use a good quality chocolate bar and chop it up myself, that's why I need the weight! Cheers, Mike
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    We currently do not have a conversion tool on our website. Here is a link to a Volume Conversion Calculator that might help. As for the chocolate chips, it depends on how fine or chunky you chop the chocolate. Just measure out 1 to 2 cups and weigh it. Cheers!
  • Mike R
    Mike R
    Thanks for the volume conversion Kimberley. The size of the chocolate chips I cut depends alot on how my day has gone (also how many chips are left after I've snaffled some) so the weight can vary somewhat. I was just after a ball park figure for the size of chips you used. I suppose for chocolate, the exact amount isn't critical, I'll just add what I have managed to avoid eating! Cheers, Mike
  • Mike R
    Mike R
    These cookies were a great hit. Excellent recipe, thanks! For info in case anyone else needs to know, the metric conversions I used were: 180g unsalted butter 290g dark brown sugar 188g white sugar (caster as I had no white granulated sugar) 150g chocolate (dark and milk, roughly 75g of each) 283g plain flour Oven 160 deg C (fan oven) The cookies spread a bit, but tasted great. Regards, Mike
  • Marshann C
    Marshann C
    Should I measure out two cups of flour and then sift? Or just sift enough flour to equal two cups? I measured out two cups of flour (after aerating the flour) but after sifting, it came out to be only about 1-1/2 cups of flour. Thanks!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    In this case you should measure the 2 cups and then sift. It really depends on how the recipe is written. This recipe is 2 cups - then it says to sift. But there are recipes that may say 2 cups sifted flour and in this case you may sift and then measure. Hope this helps - cheers!
  • Marshann C
    Marshann C
    I had tried this recipe a few weeks ago and decided to watch the video again after I posted my last question. The video shows to scoop out two cups of flour (aerated first I would assume?) and then sift. So measure then sift. Sorry I jumped the gun in posting a question that has already been demonstrated in the video.
  • Rob S
    Rob S
    ...and it was her most successful batch of cookies yet! She's always suffered from them coming out wrong somehow -- either flat (common) or not quite as tasty as she'd hoped, etc. But these came out perfect, and she's incredibly thrilled. :) I'm not sure why she's had them come out flat so many times, but maybe it was the butter. She was always told never, ever to melt the butter, so she always just softened it a bit in the microwave. For this recipe, she melted it completely and let it cool to room temperature. Maybe that made the difference! In any case, she's ecstatic. Thank you for this wonderful recipe, Rouxbe!
  • Kenshasa jade J
    Kenshasa jade J
    hi.. reading comment and it made me really eager to try making this cookies. but one question though iv heard that u use fleur de sel instead of table salt? and its much better than table salt.. question is, is it available in groceries.. u know like walmart or something.. nad hmm wonderinf too how much it usually cost. i sooo wanna try this one..
  • Kenshasa jade J
    Kenshasa jade J
    w/c choco chip is much better? semi-sweet or bitter sweet chocolate? thnks a lot!
  • Linda C
    Linda C
    you might want to try a health food store. I live in a small town, and our health food store is the only place I can find fleur de sel, other than driving to Pittsburgh. Or, as I usually do, order on-line.
  • Kenshasa jade J
    Kenshasa jade J
    ohhh i see.. i wonder if we have it in Louisiana? and how much they do usually cost? and oh order online? would u mind if i ask about what site u go to order and purchase fleur de sel? and how much it all cost? if it wont cause u any trouble. i would really appreciate it.. thanks a lot for the reply!
  • Linda C
    Linda C
    I order from Amazon.com all the time, and they seem to have the widest range of price. Also, www.surlatable.com and www.Williams-Sonoma.com have it among others, but I usually find the best price on Amazon. You can pay anywhere from $5.00 up to $38.00. Check out the review section on Amazon, it can be helpful.
  • Kenshasa jade J
    Kenshasa jade J
    thanks so much linda thats really a great help... thanks!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Any chocolate chips will work for this recipe, it mostly comes down to personal preference. You might want to watch the drill-down that is attached to the recipe, which called Which Chocolate Chip to Use? as it talks specifically about this. Cheers!
  • Andrew L
    Andrew L
    I love that this thread has been going on for 3 years! Who does not like chocolate chip cookies? These are really delicious by the way. For a twist on this recipe I added the juice from one lemon to the butter after it was melted and before cooling. Then added the zest from the lemon to the wet ingredients. The combination of lemon and chocolate is one that is really good. The cookies did not last very long around here any ways... I used white chocolate chips in mine. Have a great day!
  • Nikolas L
    Nikolas L
    Are there any rules for how long things last in the freezer? I'm curious about the cookies specifically, but in general too, this is always something that has been a mystery to me.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Honestly, I am not sure exactly how long these cookies will keep in the freezer as I they have never lasted more than a month for us in the freezer (because they get eaten too fast). I would say they would be find for a least a few months. Food safety-wise they will keep almost indefinitely but the quality could suffer over time. As for how long all foods will freeze, this depends on the ingredient, how it was prepared and packaged, whether or not it was stored at the correct temperature etc. etc. Here are a few links you may find helpful. http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/focus_on_freezing/index.asp#12 http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/freeze/freezer_shelf_life.html You can also do a search online and there you will find many sites that provide charts that give estimates for general freezing times for many foods. Hope this helps. Cheers!
  • Robert S
    Robert S
    I am sitting in a library and I have just finished your lesson on making broths. Quite informative to say the least. The instructor has apleasant voice as she instructs you. It sure is a far cry from having an angry frenchman over your shoulder making you so nervous that you burn the flour while making the roux for a bechemel sauce. This is only a fourteen day trial is it not. Bummer
  • Jenny W
    Jenny W
    Can I substitute the unsalted butter with salted butter?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    It is generally always better to bake with unsalted; however if you only have salted butter you could use it in this recipe, but do not expect the same results. Also, keep in mind that you will likely need to decrease the amount of salt in the recipe. Cheers!
  • Jenny W
    Jenny W
    Thanks for your quick answer. I usually only have salted butter at home, but I just went to the store and bought unsalted butter. I might try a batch with salted butter and one with unsalted butter just to see the difference. Thanks!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Great idea Jenny. Testing things out for yourself is the best way to learn (and of course form your own opinion). Hope you enjoy the cookies and feel free to report back your results. Cheers!
  • Jenny W
    Jenny W
    Hi Dawn! I just tried this recipe with salted butter and I reduced the salt to 1/4 tsp. The cookies came out perfect and the taste was pretty much the same as when using unsalted butter. I got this free trial for Rouxbe Cooking School from the Cooking Club of America.I am on my last 48 hours and I have enjoyed it tremendously and have learned a lot. Unfortunately I am not able to pay for continuation at the moment, but I hope one day I will. Thank you all! It has been very educational and the videos and comments are extremely well done and very helpful.Thank you!
  • Marlena L
    Marlena L
    Any preference in which to use to cook these? I have a new oven and am not sure which to use for these cookies. Thanks!
  • Ian P
    Ian P
    Interested in the answer...
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    It doesn't matter. Convection is just quicker because it forces air evenly around the oven and food. If using convection, most modern day ovens recalculate the temperature and drop it by about 25 degrees. You'll have to shorten the baking time and keep an eye on the cookies as they'll bake a bit faster. Cheers!
  • Echo S
    Echo S
    i read the instructions and read all of the comments before baking this cookie....and right now sitting on my baking tray is two rows of blob...(sniff sniff). I tried to figure out what went wrong...but i really need help... 1. melting the butter I used a microwave to melt the butter. I don't want to overcook it, so i took the butter out when it is half liquid half soft butter. I stirred it evenly and let sit to room temperature. the consistency in the end is like milk curd. 2. adding the flour i sifted 2 cups of flour (so actually what's left may not be exactly 2 cups) and began making my dough with an electric mixer. I noticed how in the video the dough before folding in chocolate chips is kind of flaky. My dough was soon creamy just with a few minutes of electric-mixing. 3. letting the batter sit in the fridge I really cooled my batter for a long time (like if I was making cut-out cookies), and when I tried to make little balls and put them on the baking tray, they were really sticky and i got the batter all over my hands. 4. baking I had my oven set around165C, preheated for over 20 minutes. half way through they were spreading out and connected with one another. around 10 minutes i opend the oven then tried to poke my cookies and it caved right in (super soft!). I turned up the temperature to almost 200C and let cook around 15 minutes. THE FINAL RESULT: Two rows of DARK blobs (probably because of the temperature)...and I separated them anyway and tried one. it was crisp and flaky outside and soft and flaky inside... --------------------------------------------------------------------- The only way I thought to fix this is to add more flour to prevent from spreading out, but I already folded in the chocolate chips...what should I do with the rest of the batter? (i only made six cookies in the first batch...that means i still have quite a lot left)...really don't want to throw them away...plz help :(
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Hard to say exactly what went wrong for you Echos but from what you have said, especially regarding the dough sticking to your hands, it sounds like you may not have measured out the ingredients accurately. As for how can you save the cookies this might be difficult to dol. Depending on how loose the dough is you could try adding a bit more flour but this will obviously not produce the same cookie as you will have to stir too much to properly incorporate it. My suggestion would be to try making these cookies again from scratch. Cheers!
  • Tuyen L
    Tuyen L
    To whom it may concern..cookies spreading out too much because improper beaten. How ever! butter and sugar beaten for 2 min then add eggs beat 30 second more. add dry ingredients all at once. then fallowing the video how they did with the dry ingredients okay.! you will no longer having flat cookies. That's how i make my cookies. happy cookies..
  • Kariman H
    Kariman H
    Hello, thankks for the wonderful recipe, I want to make this recipe but with a change, I want to make chocolate cookies with chocolate chips, I mean I want to add cocoa to the recipe, how much would be or what's the recipe for chocolate cookies?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Sure, you can try adding some cocoa. Start with 3 to 5 tablespoons and make sure to sift it together with the flour. Cheers!
  • Kariman H
    Kariman H
    Well, will I have to use less flour?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    No, the amount of flour should not change. Cheers!
  • Kariman H
    Kariman H
    Thanks, but wouldn't that affect the texture?!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    It should be fine. Cocoa tends to dissolve quite a bit when combined with wet ingredients. Cheers!
  • Melissa  N
    Melissa N
    I don't have a electric mixer...any suggestions if mixing the batter by hand
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    The batter can be mixed by hand - even with a spatula or wooden spoon. There is a note in the text recipe: *Note: For cookies with a chewier texture, melt the butter and let cool slightly. Use a wooden spoon to mix the cookie dough together. A mixer incorporates more air into the dough, which will make the cookies cakier. Cheers!
  • Laura J
    Laura J
    Here is a maybe silly question: Can the chocolate chips in this recipe be substituted with raisins or cherries for example to turn it into raisin cookies or cherry cookies? Just curious
  • John H
    John H
    all I have right now is salted butter would I use less salt or would that not work
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    It's up to you. You can substitute raisins, cherries or nuts...whatever you prefer. I do remember seeing a funny t-shirt though that said, "Stupid raisins...stay out of my cookies". My husband brings that up every time I attempt to put them in there. Haha. Cheers!
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    If all you have is salted butter, you can substitute it but hold back on the fleur de sel. Might be too overpowering. Next time, make sure to buy unsalted butter as that is what we bake and cook with almost all of the time. It allows you to control the level of salt in all of your cooking/baking. Cheers!
  • Sarah C
    Sarah C
    Hi! I'm about to make these and I noticed the recipe calls for one tablespoon of vanilla. Is that correct? Most other recipes I've used call for one teaspoon (not tablespoon). I've never used that much- just wanted to check with you first!
  • Joe G Rouxbe Staff
    Joe G
    1 tablespoon is the correct measure for this recipe. You're going to love them. Enjoy!
  • Jim C
    Jim C
    Recipes are a great way to learn another language. I tutor a few kids in the neighborhood with their English lessons and when I whipped up a batch of these great cookies at the end of the school year this past June, the mothers wanted to know how to do it themselves. What better way to motivate kids to learn than to give them a chocolate-chip-cookie-baking lesson in English. The kids baked, the mothers watched. I just thought you'd like to know Dawn, your recipe has not only made a number of Spanish kids very, very happy with these cookies (unknown here in this village before), but they now understand a few difficult verbs too.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Super cool! Thanks for sharing that Jim :-)
  • Katie P
    Katie P
    Hi, This post does not relate to the recipe, but to one of the related videos I watched on wooden spoons. The video says to wash with soap and water. Growing up, I learned never to use soap when washing wood, and just scrubbed with hot water. Do you know why many people think soap should not be used and why you recommend using it? Also, feel free to let me know if there is a more appropriate place on the site for this question. Thank you! Katie
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Some people do, some people don't. When wooden spoons are really dirty, we prefer to use a bit of soap to clean them. It's really up to you. As long as they are rinsed very well and left to dry completely, they will be fine. Cheers!
  • Yt N
    Yt N
    Made these cookies for the 3rd time since I've learnt it here and again they were a hit among my team. What I've learnt so far from this recipe: - Melted butter (this step was a lesson in temperature control/time management with the microwave/refrigerator considering that I reside in a tropical climate) - Creaming Butter and Sugar Properly (recognising colour change from yellow to pale yellow/ivoryish) - Substituting some white sugar for brown sugar to adjust sweetness - Fleur de Sel (acquired a small tub after learning of its existence from here, however I prefer regular salt for even saltiness in my cookies and will save the exquisite salt for my meats instead ;-) ) - That I don't need to get the whole cookie to bake till dark brown; just the edges and it's perfecto - Time management (I'm still not able to make this in the stipulated 30 min cooking time but at least I know what not to do compared to when I first started out :-) ) Thanks Rouxbe!
  • Paul A
    Paul A
    My choco chip cookies have been coming out great in the past. I just baked some and changed the recipe a bit and had interesting (although not as good) results. I basically use a recipe that calls for 2 sticks (8 oz) of butter. This time I used 2 1/2 sticks. I found that the cookies did not rise like they had previously. Now my questions is do you believe the extra butter had something to do with this or could my baking soda possibly have died on me (it's older than I care to admit, however, my cookies rose just fine 2 month ago with said Baking soda). The funny thing is I've always said to myself that I wanted flatter cookies and now that I made them I prefer them a little puffier. I noticed that your recipe calls for 6 oz of butter, I just used about 10 oz. Almost twice as much. I have a feeling it was the butter.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    It's hard to say what exactly was the cause without knowing the other ingredients in the other recipe you used. A high fat/low moisture ratio in the batter can cause the cookies to be crispy and can also be quite thin. Also, there are several factors that can cause cookies to spread. High amounts of granulated sugar or baking soda and the way in which the ingredients are combined (how much air is incorporated into the batter), as well as the temperature of your oven all will have an impact. Good for trying different things out, but I say if you liked the cookies in the past, I'd stick with it. Not entirely clear if you have given this particular recipe a try but this is a great formula. I actually just made a batch the other night and used some quality, milk-chocolate chips and they were very yummy. And yes, old baking soda can cause the cookies not to rise, so it is worth it to get a new box. Cheers!
  • Paul A
    Paul A
    I just realized that I put one cup of white sugar too much into this recipe. It hit me when I read your comment about too much granulated sugar. My measuring cup goes to two cups and instead of pouring 3/4 cup of white sugar I pored 1 3/4 cups (further evidence of my impending dementia). I presume that was the problem. I do have a question about your comment regarding air incorporation. Are you saying not to mix the batter as much or, conversely, if you want a flater cookie to mix it a bit longer than normal? I'm assuming longer batter mixing equals more air incorporation. I threw away the first batch of cookies. I do have dough which i put in the freezer. I was wondering if i could simply add some flour to the reamaining dough and remix to even out the sugar level better. Will this just ruin all the proportions of everything or is it worth a try.?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    It sounds like it was the sugar as well. Regarding air, it depends on the formula, but in general the more you cream butter and sugar, the cookies can potentially spread. If you cream the butter and sugar less, the cookies can be more dense. Batter that is already made and frozen will be difficult to tweak. By trying to add flour at that stage, it will be difficult to incorporate and you'll wind up over mixing...which can lead to a tough cookie. You can try, but I don't know what the result will be like. We have all made measuring mistakes. This is why it is best to all your mise en place measured out (double check the amounts) before you start mixing. Cheers!
  • Jim C
    Jim C
    I've made these a few times successfully, but I've always wondered why only the yoke of the second egg should be added rather than two whole eggs. I see above that April mentioned something about it and Joe responded, but I'm not sure if the logic for this is to maintain the thicker form. I've made these cookies with other recipes in the past with whole eggs and kept the batter cold until baking, which seemed to be enough to make the cookies thick and chewy. So my question is why leave out the egg white? Thanks! Jim By the way, I only recently found Fleur de sal here in Spain and yes, it does make a difference in the flavor. Great tip. For those in Spain, you can find it at Eroski, Carrefour, and probably El Corte Inglés.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Eggs perform many functions in baking. They help to leaven, flavor, tenderize, stabilize, enrich, bind and emulsify. They add color, nutritional value and help to extend a product's shelf life. Egg yolks contain fat and will therefore add more richness to the batter (egg whites contain no fat). An extra egg white will add additional moisture to the formula and could result in a different final consistency/texture. Other recipes may have had more dry ingredients in them to compensate for the extra moisture (or they will simply produce a different texture). There are so many factors at play (how the batter was mixed, handled, the temperature of the butter, the oven, etc.) that will all have an impact on the final result. It takes time to understand the functions of each ingredient and how they affect baked goods. With baking, it's often harder to tweak ingredients. That's why baking revolves around formulas and when you find a good one, you should stick with it. It takes plenty of baking experience (and possibly many failed attempts) to alter a formula. The best learning is to try it out but do so with an open mind because the result may be less than satisfactory. Hope this helps. Cheers!
  • Jim C
    Jim C
    That explains it! I should have checked the proportions of the ingredients in the other recipe as well. Yes, it has more flour. I'm sticking to this recipe though and as I've mentioned earlier in this thread, I've used it in my lesson plans. Thank you so much Kimberly. Cheers to you too! Jim
  • Jim C
    Jim C
    Kimberly's response to my question above made me wonder what a large egg (the common US recipe size) meant here in Europe. Wiki has a page with charts about how much "egg" is in various sizes in various parts of the world. I suppose if you had medium eggs in one part of the world and the recipe you're following is calling for large eggs comes from another continent, you might need to resort to the liquid ounces or grams listed on this page. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_egg_sizes
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Yes, you make a good point. This is why professional bakers weigh ingredients (so it doesn't matter where they are in the world, their products will generally turn out the same). Weighing makes it very easy to quickly measure how many whole eggs, egg whites or egg yolks are required for a particular recipe/formula. All of the recipes on our site call for large eggs (unless otherwise specified). Here in Canada, large eggs roughly weigh 50 grams (30 grams for the white and 20 grams for the yolk) excluding the shell. This is why bakers and cooks also have to have some solid math skills to scale recipes and do conversions. Cheers!
  • Riley M
    Riley M
    I'm making a double batch (BIG family, and they're all cookie hoarders) and adding about 8 tb. of cocoa powder. Does that sound about right? I just took a shot :P Also, I am not sure how packed the brown sugar is supposed to be. I'm just getting my mise en place ready right now, and I have it just slightly packed :P Anyway, thanks for this amazing recipe, can't wait to try it out! My mom has a good recipe, but they're never quite as chewy as I'd like them.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    In baking, substituting gets trickier because formulas are designed so that the proportions of ingredients work harmoniously together (i.e. proportion of dry ingredients to wet ingredients, the amount of baking soda vs. the amount of acid in a recipe, etc.). It is too hard to say how they will turn out without trying it (you will likely need to decrease the quantity of flour). This drill down shows how to measure brown sugar. Rather than making tweaks with a double batch, I'd recommend trying it out on only 1 batch to see if you like the results. Cheers!
  • Riley M
    Riley M
    I ended up making them like I said above. I did two seperate batches, one that got cocoa and one that didn't. The ones without the cocoa were perfect, and the ones with it were really good, but a little hard :P I microwaved some and put it on ice cream and we still got a good desert out of it. Anyway, next time I'll take out some flour if I add cocoa :P The biggest reason I did that was the fear that I didn't have enough chocolate chips. But, ah well, trial and error. Delicious trial and error P: Thanks for the recipe guys! :) Will be making some more yummy stuff from the site this weekend.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Great job for trying! That's what we want to see - students getting in there and testing and tweaking to try things out for themselves. It's the best learning process. There's nothing wrong with harder cookies...especially when they have chocolate in them :-)
  • Eric G
    Eric G
    I've made these a few times now and the tops are always cracked kind of look like an oatmeal raisin cookie. What should I do different? that fleur de sel is incredible! the second time I made it I increased the salt x3 so I can really taste it with the chocolate. Unhealthy but I only made 6 that way.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Roll them into smooth balls prior to baking. Also make sure to test the internal temperature of your oven. It may be running too hot. Cheers!
  • Charlena P
    Charlena P
    The cookies tasted great. This is definatley a keeper. However, I was a little disappointed that the chocolate chips didn't melt. I actually cooked my first batched a little too long hoping to get the chips to melt a little but it didn't happen. Any thoughts?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    I am not sure why the chocolate chips did not melt. Perhaps it was the type of chips you were using?
  • Echo S
    Echo S
    when i mix the melted butter and the two types of sugar together, they did not mix well and it was very grainy. My brown sugar actually formed into very sandy-like sugar balls. Could the problem be the butter? because when melted and sit at room temperature for an hour it's still looks like oil (like someone's butter problem above) I went ahead and mix anyway and then put it in the fridge for a bit to try to let it harden a bit. Anyway can I go ahead and bake them or should i just make another batch? also, when i mix the butter and the sugar, the color was SUPER dark. it was not pale brown like yours. What could have gone wrong? Is it because i used "dark brown sugar" instead of the paler one used in the video? Thanks a lot. I can never seem to nail this recipe (sigh)
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Do not worry Echo, the grains of sugar will not totally dissolve and they will a bit look grainy, especially if you have used a wooden spoon to mix, rather than the mixer (which is the method we now prefer). And yes, the color of the butter and sugar when mixed together will be darker, depending on the color of your sugar and whether or not you mixed by hand or by using a hand-mixer. I am sure if you bake the batch you have they will turn out perfectly. And if not, then keep trying. At least your practice cookie are still delicious :-)
  • Charlena P
    Charlena P
    In previous comments people have asked about using 1 tablespoon of vaniilla. In the recipe that is currently posted only list 2 teaspoons of vanillia. Why the change when all the Rouxbe Staff verified 1 tablespoon and how great the cookie were? Just wondering. I have made several batches of these cookies as listed and they are awesome. Thank you.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    We changed the amount of vanilla to be a bit "everyone-friendly". If you really like the flavor of vanilla, by all means you can add a full tablespoon. Personally, over the last few years, I have found that I like a bit less vanilla in most things. I just like it to be a bit more subtle. Cheers!
  • Daniel P
    Daniel P
    I experimented with this recipe and found the following. I hope this helps anyone having problems. I enjoy thick, chewy cookies. I live in high altitude too. I didn't modify the ingredients of the recipe any, just refined the technique. I just had to make sure my flour wasn't too "airy" so I didn't end up putting less flour in it then was needed. Many cookies lost their lives to get this information :-) I researched the reason for melting the butter and found a good explanation about how the butter's emulsion breaks down creating more water for the gluten to form and therefore creating a chewier cookie. It doesn't seem to really matter if the butter is liquid or more solid after cooling except that a cooler butter makes it easier to cool in the fridge before cooking, which effects the thickness of the cookie (explained later). What works for me is melting in the microwave until it is just a liquid and then cooling the dish in ice water while frequently stirring the butter until it is the consistency of yogurt. I'm starting to believe that this also helps with making a thicker cookie too. I cream the butter and sugar at high speed to incorporate more air in the dough. I also use a high quality 3x strength vanilla to give a higher quality taste. I prefer a little less chocolate chips in my dough than in the recipe, but I also enjoy mixing different types just for fun. I have to say the salt makes a big difference. I can't find fleur de sel here locally, so I have been using a course grind of a local salt here called "Redmond Real Salt." it is similar to Himalayan salt, except cheaper because it is mined nearby were I live, and it is sweeter. It is worth looking up on the Internet. The course texture of the salt made for little pin like points in the cookie that awakened the taste buds for a pleasantly sweet taste. Others couldn't tell what it was that made the difference, but I did. I weigh my dough out to 2.5 ounces exactly. I find it looks better for presentation when you have big cookies that are the exact size except that I have to convince others I made them instead of buying them. Also, they seem to cook better and achieve a better thickness when they are bigger. smaller cookies just don't cook well. I get 15 cookies out of the recipe; that would be a dozen to give away and three extra for my little helpers and me. Chilling the dough made the biggest difference with the thickness of the cookies. I chill them for about 45 minutes on the baking tray AFTER I form the dough (six cookies per sheet to give them room). I roll it in a ball and then press it into a cylindrical shape so it make a nice tall dough. My cookies cooked for different times and temperatures depending on how much the dough was chilled. less chilled dough cooked better at slightly higher temperature for less time while more chilled dough faired better with the 325 degree oven for about 14 minutes. I cooked them until the top just gets past the still-looking-raw stage. They end up looking like little domes when I remove them from the oven and then collapse to the proper thickness when they cool. I like the cookies when they have had a good few hours to a day to rest. The following resulted in flat, crispier cookies for me: Too much butter (result of improperly measured flour), dough was not chilled enough, and not cooking them at the right temperature or cooking them for too long. I tested many batches with some fatalities, but eventually perfected it and received some very sincere compliments from many people. This is what has worked for me; I hope it helps others looking for help. Thanks to everyone in the forum with all their great information and ideas. Happy Baking!
  • Angelica E
    Angelica E
    This is hands down my favorite chocolate chip recipe ever!! I've tried many. I followed technique of melting butter, then just cooling, and mixed by hand. I personally like the 2tsp measurement for vanilla the best. I use a very good vanilla, so the flavoring is strong. I can't wait to get my hands on some fleur de sel and good quality chocolate for my next batch. I added some chunky walnut pieces and my friend said tasted like the old Mrs. Field's chunky cookie. Thanks again for an awesome recipe. Rouxbe staff never disappoints.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Yeah, we are so glad that you like the recipe! And thank's for your kind words :-) Cheers.
  • Diogo B
    Diogo B
    If I want to use vanilla beans instead of vanilla extract, how many beans should I use in this recipe?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Vanilla beans are quite a bit more expensive then extract and are not always used so much in preparations such as these cookies because the heat and baking time will diminish the beans flavor; however, if you still wanted to use a bean, I would start with about a half of a bean — scrap out the seeds and add that to the liquid. Here is a good article about When to a Vanilla Bean & When to Use Vanilla Extract. Hope that helps. Cheers!
  • Yuseph K
    Yuseph K
    Hi, I've made this a bunch of times and they usually turn really great. The fleur de sel makes a big difference for me. I have a question about the first part when you cream the sugar with the butter. It says to use a mixer but when I do, the sugar and butter sticks to the mixer. Am I doing something wrong? (sorry in advance if this question was answered earlier in the thread. Its a long thread!~)
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Yuseph- Most likely, the butter needs to be a bit softer and have a bit of air whipped into it to make it less "sticky" and more creamy. It needs more time to get going, but you will see a change in volume and color. You may need to do it by hand (old fashioned way, vigorously in a bowl) if your particular mixer is not working for you. Good luck! ~Ken.
  • Srirat P
    Srirat P
    Hi:) what is the best way to store the cookie after baking ? Thank you so much
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Once the cookies have completely cooled they can be stored in an airtight container. They will last for a few days at room temperature. Alternatively, they can be frozen, either cooked or raw. I prefer to store cookies dough portioned and raw — then whenever you feel like a cookie or two, you simply bake them off and they are nice and fresh. Cheers.
  • Srirat P
    Srirat P
    Thank you so much Dawn
  • Yasmin S
    Yasmin S
    Any tips on how to make sure the fleur de sel is evenly distributed in the cookie dough? Some of my cookies had a a small clump of salt, and others tasted like they had none at all. Nevertheless, these were the best chocolate chip cookies I have ever had. Thank you!
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Yasmine - Easy fix here! Next time you add the salt, just sprinkle it in the dough so it covers more surface area. If you just dump it in one spot, it may not spread evenly. ~Ken
  • Yasmin S
    Yasmin S
    Will do--Thank you, Ken!
  • Donna H
    Donna H
    I've made these cookies a few times and they are delicious, however even though I weigh the ingredients every time, and chill every time sometimes the cookies still spread out. I did notice that with the batch that I made last night, that the dough was softer than it should be. I was hoping that chilling them would be enough; but alas they spread out really thin. My question is; if the dough is to thin in constancy and I add more flour, do I need to add more baking soda?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Donna - A bit more flour is all you need. That will offer the structure so the cookie stays a bit taller as it cooks versus spreading out. ~Ken
  • Srirat P
    Srirat P
    Hi:) After baking ,and allow the cookies to cool down, they become hard! What should I do to prevent it ! Thank you Tum
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    It sounds like you might just be cooking them for a bit too long. Typically, these cookies are soft and moist, even when cooled. Cheers!
  • Srirat P
    Srirat P
    Thank you Dawn:) will try again

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