Warm Apple Cobbler

Warm Apple Cobbler

Details

Indulge in warm apples spiced with cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg. Served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, this is true comfort food.
  • Serves: 8 to 10
  • Active Time: 40 mins
  • Total Time: 2 hrs
  • Views: 33,670
  • Success Rating: 98% (?)
    0% - I fed it to the dog
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Steps

Step 1: Preparing and Baking the Apples

• 13 whole, granny smith apples
• 1/4 cup sugar
• 1/4 cup brown sugar
• 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
• 1/4 tsp ground ginger
• 1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
• 1/8 tsp ground cloves
• 1/4 cup blackberry honey (or any other quality honey)
• 1/4 cup apple cider
• 1 1/2 tbsp lemon juice
• 6 tbsp unsalted butter

Method

To begin, preheat your oven to 350º degrees Fahrenheit. To make the mixture for the apples, add the white sugar, brown sugar, ginger, cloves, fresh nutmeg and cinnamon to a large bowl and mix together. Next, add the honey, apple cider and lemon juice and whisk everything together. Set aside.

Peel the apples, slice into quarters and remove the core. Depending on what size your apples are, cut each quarter into three or four slices. Place into the mixture and toss each time before peeling the next apple, so they don’t turn brown.

Once done, pour the apples into a large baking dish. They will shrink down, so it’s okay if they come right up to the top.

Top with the butter and bake for approximately 30 minutes, until the apples start to release their juices. Test the apples by inserting a knife. They should feel a tiny bit hard in the center, but cooked on the outside. Once done, toss the apples and set aside to cool for approximately 30 minutes.

Turn up the oven to 375º degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 2: Making the Topping

• 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
• 3/4 cup sugar
• 1/2 tsp table salt
• 1/4 tsp baking powder
• 3/4 cup unsalted butter
• 3/4 cup rolled oats
• 6 tbsp heavy cream

Method

To make the topping, place the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder into a bowl and mix to combine. Cut the butter into small pieces, and then cut into the mixture with a pastry cutter or knife. Once done, you should still see little pieces of butter. Fold in the rolled oats, add the cream and stir until just combined. The mixture will still be a bit dry, but that’s perfectly fine.

Step 3: Baking and Serving the Cobbler

Method

Before baking the cobbler, give the apples one last stir. There will still be some liquid at the bottom, but it will all get soaked up as it bakes. Pour the topping over the apples and spread it out evenly. Bake for approximately 45 minutes or until golden brown on top.

Once done, let cool for at least 15 to 30 minutes before serving. This dessert is delicious with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Chef's Notes

The type of honey really makes a difference in flavor, so use a good quality honey. You could also experiment with pure maple syrup, if you like.

Note: If you over cook the apples before you add the topping, they will be mushy later. Personally, I like the apples to have a very tiny bit of crunch to them.

39 Comments

  • Steve E
    Steve E
    My only real experience with desserts is I never like to miss one. This is one of the few times I've ventured to make a dessert and I was astonished with the results. I thought baking was supposed to be difficult, this was easy to make. I can tell myself with all the apples it's good for me but who am I kidding when you eat it by the cereal bowl full.
  • Lame L
    Lame L
    Is it possible to substitute the cream for something else?
  • Clay T
    Clay T
    My apples were big so it only took ten of them. I was not able to find fresh nutmeg but despite that this dessert was a big hit at my wine tasting dinner.
  • William B
    William B
    Can u add apple juice, in stead of apple cider?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You sure can use apple juice instead of apple cider. The cider just gives the cobbler a bit of a richer flavor...but the apple juice will work just fine.
  • Valerie J
    Valerie J
    Made this for the first time and it was quite simple. Although I still had a great deal of liquid once done, it had a great taste. Why do you think I still had so much liquid. Could it have been the type of honey? I used a store brand.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    the type of honey you used should not really make a big difference in excess liquid, just flavor. Perhaps the reason maybe you had some leftover liquid could be the water content of the apples. Also, did you let it sit for about 30 minutes after the apples came out of the oven. This is when they soak up most of that excess liquid. Glad to hear you like the flavors.
  • Darcie N
    Darcie N
    I made this over the weekend for my husband. I've made apple cobbler many times but this was a new recipe for me. The added creme made a huge difference in the flavor. This is an amazing recipe. SOOO incredibly easy (the hardest part seriously is peeling the apples!). LOVED it!!!
  • Jack C
    Jack C
    What would be a good substitute for Rolled Oats?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You could use more flour and omit the oats. The result will not be quite the same, but it will still be good. I also make another crust that is oat-free, I use approximately 1 cup of sugar, to 1/2 cup butter and about 3/4's of a cup of flour. Cream together the sugar and butter and then blend in flour. Spread this mix over top of the apples and bake as usual. This will result in a crust that is kind of like crumbled cookies. Good luck, hope this helps! dawn
  • Abigail V
    Abigail V
    here in my hometown, only 2 kinds of apple are easy to buy in the market. red apples and the ones we call Fuji apples. i tried using the fuji since it is cheaper but doesnt produce a juicy apple taste result... maybe it also differ on the kind of apple. is the green apple better for cooking? well, next time i'll try the red one.
  • Jaime S
    Jaime S
    I just finished making this apple cobbler. It turned out so good. The clove, cinnamon, and ginger work so well together; they made the extra trip to the store really worth it. The rolled oats give the crust a great texture and a more complex flavor than just using flour. This cobbler rivals the one my sister would make years ago (Actually I think this one is even better, but don't tell her I said so). I will definitely make this again.
  • Elsie D
    Elsie D
    I do love cobblers but was looking for a peach/apricot cobbler recipe. If I substitute apples for peaches/apricots how many would I use?. Also would I still use apple cider or should I substitute that as well?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    The recipe calls for about 13 apples so you would likely need the same amount or a bit more, depending on the size of the peaches or apricots. You could still use apple cider as the liquid though as it won't overpower the peach or apricot. Cheers!
  • Roxana G
    Roxana G
    Quick question: can this me made one day in advance or is it better to serve the same day? Thank you!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    I think it is best to make it the same day so the topping doesn't get soft from the apples below. That being said, leftovers are still very good, they are just not exactly the same as when it is freshly made. Cheers!
  • Sheri M
    Sheri M
    I'm thinking of making this for Thanksgiving supper. Could one bake the apples ahead of time (say, earlier in the morning) and then complete the dish later? Sadly, oven space is at a bit of a premium in my kitchen!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    I have not tried it myself but I am sure that you could bake the apples first and then finish the cobbler later. Cheers!
  • Sheri M
    Sheri M
    Thanks Dawn, I will let you know how it turns out!
  • Sheri M
    Sheri M
    Just wanted to let you know that baking the apples ahead of time worked out very well. I had the topping prepped in advance as well (except for the cream) and then I completed the dish and put it in the oven while we were eating the main course. I served the cobbler with cinnamon clove ice cream - it was a big hit :)
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Good for you for experimenting and thanks for sharing your feedback with all of us. Cheers!
  • Joe D
    Joe D
    This recipe came out perfect in just one try. Thanks jj
  • Melissa  N
    Melissa N
    Just wondering if adding raspberries or cranberries would work and if so...would it be best to add to the apple mixture and cook at 350 like recipe calls for.. -thanks.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You can add other fruits (either raspberries or cranberries will add a nice tart contrast to the sweet apples) and you are correct in thinking that they should be added with the apple mixture and then cooked as per the recipe. Enjoy!
  • Erik P
    Erik P
    Hey everyone, I'll make this for tonight; I'm planning to zest the whole lemon before juicing it and adding the zest to the apple mixture. Will let you know how it goes.
  • Erik P
    Erik P
    I very much enjoyed the cobbler I made yesterday. I added not just the zest of one lemon, but also the zest of an orange and about half a cup of Grand Marnier orange liqueur. That made for a very fresh and citrusy flavour while retaining the warm spiciness that makes the cobbler so great. It was a great success! Thanks for the recipe.
  • Laura C
    Laura C
    I have read the comments and see that different fruits would work on this recipe. How about only blueberries or strawberries with no other fruit. Should I add or subtract any ingredients?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Careful when substituting the whole amount with berries because they contain much more water than apples do. They need some sort of binder/thickener. Here is an example that you could try. Basically, this type of dish is simply cooked fruit with a crumbly topping. Apples fare well when baked, but like I said, berries are different because they contain more water. Give this recipe a try and let us know how it goes. Cheers!
  • Laura C
    Laura C
    Thank you Kimberley for your suggestion. I swear I will do the recipe with apples in the fall but now, I am trying to find a good recipe for a blueberry cobbler for here in PA they grow well. For me, some berries are semi-exotic (I am not originally from the USA) so, I am learning to use them. I find blueberries the type of fruits that go better when paired with other flavors rather that on their own. That is why I was attracted to Dawn's recipe. Ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, lemon and cloves sound like a wonderful compliment to blueberries as well. Before I looked at the recipe that you pointed out, I decided to take note of your observation and add corn starch to the blueberry mix. Then, I followed the apple cobbler recipe. Although it was not bad, in the end many of the flavors were lost. I could not feel none of those wonderful flavor notes of ginger, nutmeg or cloves. Also, the filling was too doughy... I used 1 tbsp. of corn starch. I think that the problem was too much cooking time for the blueberries. Now, I am going to experiment with the recipe that you pointed out from "DOMESTIFLUFF" but will add the flavors suggested from Rouxbe recipe with perhaps some Calvados... I like that this recipe asks to mix part of the topping with the berry mix. This helps to absorb the blueberry juices as they tend to overflow the topping. I will let you know how it works. In the meantime, if you come across -or someone else does- a Blueberry cobbler recipe that you can resist, would you let me know? Thank you for responding to our posts.
  • Laura C
    Laura C
    Dear Kimberly, I just wanted to let you know that I was able to modify the recipe to come out with a wonderful blueberry cobbler. I was very satisfied with the result. I used Rouxbe recipe with several modifications and followed some of the advice of the recipe from DOMESTIFLUFF. In the end, the cobbler looked and tasted great, so good that my mother in law asked me to leave the leftover dessert to offer to her friends the next day.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Nice work Laura! That's what cooking is all about. Once you learn certain skills and techniques, it becomes easier and easier to make your own tweaks to recipes (in Rouxbe's world, recipes are also known as flavor combinations / series of techniques) just by thinking about the process and the result that you are trying to achieve. Keep it up :) Cheers!
  • Melissa  N
    Melissa N
    i want to make this for a friend, but she has allergies to butter and dairy. I know there are soy butters out there, but what i can substitute for the heavy cream in the recipe. thanks
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    We have not tested this recipe with anything other than real butter and cream, so it is hard for us to say what will absolutely work. Instead of cream you could try another non-dairy product but again we have not tested this. Here is a good site, that you may want to bookmark, for substitutions. Cheers!
  • Caroline D
    Caroline D
    may I put the cut apples mixed in the mixture in the baking dish and put it in the refrigerator and bake it later that day? Or will that make my apples turn brown.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    We have not tried it but I imagine that the apples will likely turn too brown or become too soggy. Cheers!
  • Barb H
    Barb H
    Is peeling simply a taste/texture thing or is there some additional science to it like the hydroscopic/hygroscopic nature of the peels causing problems or...? I admit I'm not usually a peeler and I haven't noticed much difference expect less mess and time spent.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You got it Barb — it's really more just about a taste/texture thing, so if you are fine with the apples unpeeled, then by all means go for it. Cheers!
  • Elaine  W
    Elaine W
    You failed to indicate the size of pan
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Elaine - Based on the photo, I'd say it's a standard 9x13 rectangular pan. ~Ken

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