Fresh Berry Tart

Fresh Berry Tart

Details

Tender pastry filled with smooth pastry cream and topped with fresh summer berries - a perfect summer treat.
  • Serves: 6 to 8
  • Active Time: 2 hrs
  • Total Time: 6 hrs
  • Views: 63,967
  • Success: 91%

Steps

Step 1: Making the Pâte Sucrée Dough

• 4 oz sugar
• 1 tsp lemon zest
• 1 large egg
• 1 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
• 8 oz softened, unsalted butter
• 1/2 tsp salt
• 12 oz all-purpose flour

Method

To start the dough, make sure all of your ingredients are at room temperature before you begin. Add the sugar to the butter. Using a wooden spoon, combine the two until they are just blended together; you don’t want to incorporate too much air.

In a separate bowl, combine the egg, vanilla, salt and the zest of one lemon. Beat with a fork to blend everything together. Add this mixture to the sugar and butter. Mix again until evenly combined, scraping down the sides of the bowl from time to time.

Next, add all of the flour in at once and fold in until it’s just incorporated. Don’t over mix, as you don’t want to develop too much gluten.

Once the flour has been incorporated, gather the dough together in the bowl and place onto the countertop.

Knead the dough briefly by “rubbing” it to ensure the flour is fully covered with the fat from the butter. Do this just a few times, as you don’t want to over work the dough. Bring the dough together and cut it into 2 equal pieces. Shape them into flat rectangles. Wrap each piece tightly with plastic wrap. Press each piece to slightly flatten it and even it out. Place onto a tray and into the refrigerator for a minimum of 30 minutes to chill.

Step 2: Making the Pastry Cream

• 5 tbsp cornstarch
• 4 oz sugar
• 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
• 4 large egg yolks
• 2 cups whole milk
• 1 pinch salt

Method

To start the pastry cream, first secure the bowl in place. Using a sturdy whisk, combine the egg yolks and sugar. Then add the cornstarch and whisk until well blended (about 2 minutes) and light in color.

Heat the milk, vanilla and salt over medium heat and bring just to the boiling point. Add a bit of the milk at first to temper the eggs, and then continue to whisk and add the milk bit by bit until fully incorporated.

Transfer the mixture back into a clean pot over medium-low heat. At this point, it’s important to whisk constantly, until it thickens and bubbles. Make sure to get the whisk right into the edges of the pot so everything cooks evenly and the bottom doesn’t scorch.

Once the mixture has clearly thickened and has started to bubble, whisk continuously for about another minute or so to cook out the cornstarch. Pour the pastry cream into a stainless-steel bowl and place over an ice bath to cool. Stir a few times to quickly bring down the temperature. Once cooled a bit, cover the surface of the pastry cream with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming.

Transfer to the refrigerator to chill completely.

Note: For a more intense vanilla flavor, the extract can be added to the pastry cream once it goes over the ice bath.

Step 3: Preparing the Tart Shells

Method

To roll the dough, lightly dust the counter and rolling pin with flour. If you find that the dough is cracking as you begin to roll it out, it may be too cold. Just allow it to sit at room temperature for a few minutes and then continue.

To prevent the dough from sticking to the counter, gently lift it and turn it slightly after every couple of rolls. Dust lightly with flour if anything sticks.

Work quickly so the dough doesn’t get too warm. Roll it out to about 1/8" of an inch thick. At any point, if you find the dough is getting too warm or it is too soft to work with, place it onto the back of a floured baking sheet and chill in the refrigerator until it is easier to work with.

Place the tart shells onto the dough and cut around, leaving about an inch or so.
Remove the tart shells and the excess dough. The leftover dough can just be pushed back together and used for another time.

Gently lift the dough and place it into one of the tart shells. This dough is very forgiving, so don’t worry if any tears occur. You can simply press the dough together. Press the dough into the base and along the sides. Pinch the dough over the edge of the tart pan to form a thicker wall. Then gently squeeze the dough along the edge so it rises a bit above the edge of the tart shell. This is a great trick in case the dough shrinks at all during baking. Press the pieces of excess dough together and freeze for future use.

Place the shell onto a tray and into the freezer or refrigerator while you assemble the remaining tarts. Once all of the tarts are assembled, poke the base of the dough a few times with a fork. This is known as docking.

Place back into the refrigerator for at least 20 minutes to ensure the dough is very cold prior to baking.

Step 4: Blind Baking the Tart Shells

Method

While the dough is chilling, preheat the oven to 375º degrees Fahrenheit.

To blind bake the tart shells, remove them from the refrigerator and place a piece of parchment inside each one. Then fill with dried baking beans or pie weights.
Flatten the beans slightly to ensure the base and sides are evenly weighed down. Then place the tart shells into the oven and bake for about 13 to 15 minutes or until you can see the edges just start to turn golden.

Once the shells have started to set, remove the beans. The dough should look like it has started to cook and set and the edges should also look a bit golden. Place back into the oven and continue to bake for another 5 to 10 minutes or until cooked through and golden brown.

For even browning, you can rotate the tray during baking. Also, if the edges seem to be getting too dark, yet the base still looks undercooked, place a piece of parchment over top. The parchment will slow any further browning while giving the bottom time to fully cook.

Once done, the edges should be golden brown and the base should be fully cooked. Place onto a rack to cool completely.

Step 5: Preparing the Fruit

Method

While the tart shells are cooling, begin preparing the fruit. Be selective when buying your fruit because the nicer the fruit, the better your tart will look and taste.

Wash the fruit just before assembling and make sure to handle it gently. Rinse the fruit very gently in a colander and then place onto a plate lined with paper towels to drain.

For the raspberries, make sure any water trapped inside is allowed to drain, as any excess water will lead to a soggy tart. Also be sure to remove any stems from the blueberries. If using smaller, wild strawberries, you can leave the stems on as they are soft enough to eat. This just makes for nicer presentation, but you can remove them if you prefer.

Step 6: Assembling the Tarts

• 1 cup fresh strawberries
• 1 cup fresh blueberries (approx.)
• 1 cup fresh raspberries (approx.)

Method

With a heavy whisk, whisk the pastry cream to completely smooth it out. It may be hard to whisk at first, but eventually it will become smooth.

Spoon a bit of the pastry cream into each shell. Use an offset spatula to spread it out evenly. Make sure not to fill the tarts more than two-thirds of the way up the sides.

Begin placing the fruit on top of the pastry cream. Start with some of the blueberries, then a few of the raspberries, followed by some of the strawberries. Fill in any holes with blueberries to ensure the entire surface is covered.

Once all of the tarts are filled with fruit, set them aside while you prepare the glaze.

Step 7: Preparing the Apricot Glaze

• 1 cup apricot jam (or jelly)
• 2 tbsp water

Method

To prepare the glaze, place the apricot jam into a small pot, add the water and stir to combine.

Bring it to a boil and then strain to remove any pieces of apricot. Straining the jam makes it easier to brush on and it also gives the finished tarts a more refined look.

Place the strained syrup back into a clean pot. When ready to glaze, bring it back to a quick boil, as hot glaze also makes it easier to achieve a thin coat. Once hot, remove from the heat and begin glazing the tarts.

Step 8: Finishing the Tarts

Method

To finish the tarts, gently brush on the glaze, making sure they are evenly coated. Aside from making the tart look shiny and beautiful, the glaze helps to hold the fruit intact and protects it from the air.

Once done, remove the ring so the jam doesn’t firm up and stick to it. Be sure to remove the bottom of the tart pan as well.

As you’re applying the glaze, it may thicken as it cools, which will make it harder to apply. Simply place it back onto the heat and add a touch more water to thin it out. Basically, it should be thin enough and hot enough to easily coat the fruit.

Once done, refrigerate the tarts for at least 2 hours to give the pastry cream time to set. This is especially important if you are making a larger tart that will need to be cut into portions. These tarts will keep until the next day; however it’s best to make them and serve them on the same day for optimum freshness.

Chef's Notes

There is enough dough in this recipe to make two, large 9" -inch tarts or six to eight 4.5" -inch individual tarts. You can make these tarts as big or as small as you’d like. Keep in mind, however, larger tarts are challenging to cut and the presentation may not look as nice.

There is enough pastry cream to fill one, large 9" -inch tart, so if you’re making two large tarts, make sure to double the recipe above.

Any leftover dough can be stored in fridge for a few days or in the freezer for up to 1 month. Thaw in the refrigerator before shaping. Alternatively, you can line the tart shells with the dough and freeze them right in the pans (wrap tightly with plastic wrap). Bake them straight from the freezer whenever you want freshly-baked tarts. Keep in mind the baking times will be longer. If resting the tart shells on a tray in the freezer, it’s a good idea to transfer them to a room-temperature tray right before baking. This way, the heat won’t have to work its way through the tray before getting to the tarts.

Any type of berries can be used for this tart. It’s best to stay away from fruits that contain a lot of liquid (i.e. oranges, watermelon) or ones that discolor (i.e. apples).

If using apricot jelly, there is no need to strain it. Just mix with a bit of water and bring to a boil to create a thin, paint-like consistency.

65 Comments

  • Jurie H
    Jurie H
    Funny, I just made this last week using a recipe from Sherry Yard. I didn't add a glaze. I had a lot of trouble making a dough that actually stuck together and could be lifted and moved without simply breaking up. In the end, I just moved it to the pie form bit by bit, Playdoh-style.
  • Laurie B
    Laurie B
    We made this while going through the culinary techniques program at L'Academie de Cuisine. It's so worth the effort - not only delicious, but a show stopper!
  • Ishcah S
    Ishcah S
    this recipe is great and tastes lovely i made it but substituted d berries 4 apples and plumrose cause d carribean doesn't have berries
  • Christine R
    Christine R
    My husband grew up in Scotland where custard is considered one of the 4 food groups. I always get him to make custard and did in this instance. The first time we made the recipe, he kept going on and on about how the custard just wasn't right while he was making it. He kept saying how stiff it was and shouldn't be like this.... Nevertheless, the tarts were amazing, so much so, that we made another batch a few weeks later. My husband "the chef", ahem... decided to alter the recipe. We ended up eating runny custard on a pie shell with fruits scattered here and there. So, you may think that the custard is thick, but I'm sure that the folks at Rouxbe have tested and tried it. Believe me, I have.
  • Joe G Rouxbe Staff
    Joe G
    Ah... glad you liked it as I think I put on 5 pounds testing this over and over and over again. :).... Thinking about starting an exercise site next.
  • Banu B
    Banu B
    Hi Steve! Thanks for the friendship request in FoodBuzz. It's great to know this site to me. Simply fall in love with it especially with this Berry Tarts! Again cheers from Istanbul, Banu
  • Casey G
    Casey G
    1. I had extra apricot glaze, so I just poured it over the last 2 tarts instead of brushing it on. Bad idea. They were much too sweet and the glaze overpowered the other flavors. I think I may leave one of the tarts unglazed to try that, or even a dusting of confectioners' sugar sounds appealing. 2. When rolling out the dough, next time I will alternate between working with the dough on the counter and the dough that is still in the refrigerator. I'm sure if I worked faster it would stay cold long enough, but this technique I think will help. 3. I will have my ice bath set up and ready to go instead of trying to assemble it while intermittently whisking my custard on the stove top. My custard came out with a few lumps and was probably a little bit overcooked.
  • Matthew B
    Matthew B
    Please let me know how long the entire cooking process took (up until the refrigeration of the tarts for 2 hours prior to serving). Also, I was unable to find 4 1/2" tart pans, but I did find 4". Will I be safe in assuming there will be enough dough for 8 tarts? Thank you! Matthew.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Hi Matthew, Start to finish, these tarts will take approximately 6 hours (total time has been updated). If you haven't worked much with dough though (i.e. shaping and lining the tart pans) or if you haven't made pastry cream before, you will likely need more time. 4-inch tart pans are fine. Baking might be a tad shorter but just monitor them. You will have enough dough for 8 tarts and probably some pastry cream left over. It will keep in the fridge for a few days and is yummy enough to be eaten with a spoon :) Happy baking!
  • Huda H
    Huda H
    it is so delicious
  • Sean H
    Sean H
    Hello. I joined at Christmas as a NON-cook, I could burn water if given the chance. I'm now scoring brownie points left, right and centre with my partner. Many thanks! Back to the question: Over here in the UK we have two main grains of white sugar, granulated and the finer caster sugar. Caster is used almost exclusively for cooking, but granulated is so commonly used for alsorts, recipies over here specify which one to use. Do you have the same in Canada or the States? If so, which one is assumed when a recipe includes 'sugar'?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    In the North America, regular granulated sugar is what is generally used in recipes. If a recipe requires caster sugar (also called superfine, berry or bar sugar - so named because the smaller crystals dissolve quicker), it will generally specify in the recipe. Hope this helps! So glad to hear that you are getting so many brownie points...keep up the good work!
  • Lori A
    Lori A
    I made this for my boyfriend for his birthday, it took 6 hours and he absolutely LOVED it. He ate a double serving and it disappeared in only a few days. Previously we had to buy them, they're called jardinière out here, but they are made with cake mix and I don't like it. I had been looking for a custard recipe for a long time. I was so happy to find this. This was amazing. I do have a question though: anybody have any ideas what to do with leftover egg whites?
  • Suzanne C
    Suzanne C
    EGG WHITES? Meringue anyone? I think this should have it's own food group. I also like my breakfast omelet with egg whites. It's a very low cholesterol alternative.
  • Alla B
    Alla B
    What could be the possible reason? Undercooked? It did get thick in the sauce pan, but never boiled. wrong measurement for cornstarch? Tbsp are confusing, I am used to using digital scales and metric system... Tarts were really tasty anyway, I just want to understand what went wrong
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Could be a number of things. Pastry cream should be brought to a boil to cook out the starch flavor. The cornstarch prevents the eggs from scrambling, so it's ok to bring it to the boil for couple of minutes. Measurements always have an impact on pastry/baking, so, yes, that could have affected things. I prefer using a scale myself, but many people don't have them, so we tend to put measurements in cups, etc. 1 tbsp of cornstarch is approximately 8 grams. If you want a stiffer pastry cream, use a bit more cornstarch next time. Lastly, make sure the pastry cream was chilled properly and allowed to set. Hope this helps! Cheers!
  • Alla B
    Alla B
    Thank so much for such a prompt reply. Measurements in grams are very helpful. I'll also try to cook it for a little longer next time.
  • Riley M
    Riley M
    I made these at a friends house in Wisconsin. Made everything from fruit from vines. I used my own cream and dough recipes, but the idea came from this recipe. Try this with raspberries, blackberries, and strawberries. I served this with Crème d'Orange (heavy cream, beaten with sugar, Gran Marnier, oange zest, and vanilla extract). To DIE for. But no matter how you serve it, this is a dessert that is priceless, and that is a great, light treat for with friends. -Keep Cooking Riley Morgan
  • Albert D
    Albert D
    Would like to know if one can substitute the apricot with some other fruit jam? Thanks
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Any type of light-colored jam/jelly that is also compatible in flavor with the tart will work. Stay away from dark-colored jams because they will alter the look of the tart dramatically. Cheers!
  • Rick P
    Rick P
    Hi When adding the warmed milk to the egg mixture I see that you first add a little and whisk to temper the egg mixture. Am I right to assume that after this stage the egg mixture cannot curdle/scramble? Many thanks Rick
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Yes, hot liquids should be added bit by bit to eggs to prevent them from curdling. In this case, because the mixture contains cornstarch, the eggs won't curdle when placed back over the heat to cook the mixture. In other cases without the cornstarch, you especially need to be careful not to overheat the mixture or it will curdle. Cheers!
  • Echo S
    Echo S
    In Taiwan we we don't have that much fresh berries (only strawberries when they are in season....other types of fresh berries like blueberries and cranberries are quite expensive....we have no fresh raspberries here), so is it okay to buy frozen berries mix? (a mix of blueberries, cranberries and raspberries). What should I be aware of when baking with frozen berries? thanks alot!
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Frozen berries aren't ideal just because once they thaw, the excess moisture will water down the pastry cream and crust. You could make a Berry Compote using the frozen berries. Once made, let it completely cool and then spoon it over top of the tarts. Alternatively, choose a different fruit that is in season in your area such as sliced mango, papaya or starfruit. Cheers!
  • Kariman H
    Kariman H
    Can I use an electric mixer while mixing the egg yolks in the beginning?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    The mixer was designed to make tasks easier. When you encounter situations like these, ask yourself if the mixer will produce the same end result as whisking by hand. If the answer is yes, then go ahead. In this instance, the whisk is used to combine the eggs and sugar and lighten the color of the mixture before it is cooked, so if you want to do this a bit quicker, use a mixer. Cheers!
  • Kariman H
    Kariman H
    Thanks :)
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    No problem. Another key thing to keep in mind is to match/adjust the mixer speed to the actual speed you'd normally use by hand. Cheers!
  • Caroline D
    Caroline D
    is this dough mixture enough to fit a 12" tart pan?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Yes, you will be able to form a large tart out of this dough. Keep in mind though that if making a large fruit tart, it is harder to cut. The pastry cream may not hold its shape...this is why we made smaller, individual tarts. You can increase the amount of cornstarch but really firm pastry cream isn't as nice to eat. Cheers!
  • K A
    K A
    I always hear people talk about 321 pie dough is this dough the same or is it something different ? I noticed that there is egg in the dough unlike the pie dough which is what got me confused.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    There are so many variations of dough. Pate brisee is sometimes referred to as a 321 dough. This means the ratio of flour : butter : water is 3:2:1. This is the most basic formula for pate brisee dough. Whether the cook chooses to add extra ingredients or make substitutions to enrich the dough, this is up to them. The dough in this recipe is for pate sucree. Pate sucree usually contains way more butter than liquid; therefore, this particular dough does not fall into a 321 category. Cheers!
  • Caroline D
    Caroline D
    can I make the pastry cream one day ahead of time?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Yes, it can be made a day in advance. Just like the video shows, cool it and store it in the refrigerator. Whisk it before assembling. Cheers!
  • Caroline D
    Caroline D
    Made this last week for my family and turned out Idelicious. I had some chocolate truffles which i melted and spread some on the bottom of the tart. the tart, the pastry cream and a thin layer of chocolate was delicious. I can eat it without the fruits. i did have a tough time rolling out the dough. It kept tearing and got warm very fast is that common? I had to put it back in the refrigerator more often. Everytime I picked up the dough it just tore.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    The dough will have a tendency to soften rather quickly, especially if your kitchen is a bit warm and you handle the dough too much. Good that you kept putting it back in the fridge as you rolled it. It is a very forgiving dough, so it's okay to press it together to seal any tears. Cheers!
  • Becky R
    Becky R
    I adore tarts, but have a food sensitivity to eggs. Any ideas on substitutes for eggs? We have used ground flax with good success, but different substitutes work with different things, we use applesauce with cookies, and I think you could use potato starch or more corn starch, but how would you adapt the recipe, or could you? Another comment, we use demarara sugar and wheat flour, are there any adjustments for this? I have seen this made with almond paste mixture, but am unfamiliar with how to do this... Thanks so much!
  • Tony M Rouxbe Staff
    Tony M
    Wish there was a simple answer to your questions. Eggs produce a certain structure and chemistry that is very hard to substitute with exact results. But sounds like you're on the right track. Find literature on vegan baking, for some vegan pastry cooks have done all the experimenting for you. At this point, this is obviously beyond the scope of a forum as we have not yet tackled this topic - which is one much more complex than any other. Every recipe can be adapted and there are adjustments for all products, and not just chemistry, but quantities and mixing methods affect end results. This is a trial and error affair, and you'll have to accept that errors will occur. But don't stop trying researching reliable literature on this and experimenting in your own kitchen.
  • Becky R
    Becky R
    Thanks so much! Any suggestions on books, authors, or where to look for good material?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    I would start by doing an online search. Perhaps check out some reviews on Amazon (here are the results of a quick search I did) or other online bookstores and/or check out your local stores or even the library. Cheers!
  • Wassim M
    Wassim M
    I made this last week and it was delicious. It was my first time ever making any type of dough or pastry cream. I made 4" tartlets and they were a hit with my guests. It was actually the best fruit tart I've ever eaten.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Nice work! Excellent skills = excellent results. Glad you enjoyed. Cheers!
  • Bart T
    Bart T
    The instruction on the tart video was exceptional. I went to the fruit stand and bought raspberries ,strawberries and blue berries picked that morning. I made four tarts. They were incredible. This was possibly the most rewarding thing I have cooked to this point. The techniques taught in this video take tarts to the next level into outer space.
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Thanks for your kind words. They mean a lot to all of us at Rouxbe. Again, as I said above, it all comes down to the cook making it. Excellent skills = excellent results, so nice work! Cheers!
  • Marc V
    Marc V
    This is one of my favorite recipes on Rouxbe and the instructions are indeed very, very good! I love this tart! I've done some experimenting with larger size tart as opposed to the small individual size ones fom the video. I like to use a 35x8 cm rectangular tart pan (about 14x3 inch), which really gives a professionally looking result. To prevent the pastry cream from being to runny when cutting the tart I add 3 (soaked) gelatin sheets (about 5 g), just after I've put the cream above the ice bath, so when it's still quite warm. You only have to be careful that you don't let the cream become too cold before putting it in the tart shell, otherwise the gelatin will have set too much. After letting the finished tart cool down totally, the gelatin gives the pastry cream a bit more structure so you can cut the tart nicely! I find the gelatin (in this amount) does not have a negative effect on the texture of the pastry cream when you eat the tart. Hopefully this is helpful for other people who would like to make a bigger size! :-) Also, red currants are delicious in this tart! Thanks, Marc
  • Ildar S
    Ildar S
    1 and 1/2 or 2 and 2/3?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    When baking, it is advisable to weigh the flour instead of measuring it by volume, especially if a recipe specifically calls for ounces. Using a scale to weigh the ingredients will produce more accurate and consistent results. Most measuring cups are not calibrated for weight measurements. For example, 12oz of flour would not occupy the same volume as 12oz of brown sugar. And on top of that, one measuring cup may not hold the same amount as another cup measuring cup of the same size (1 cup for example). However, with that said, you could try the recipe using 1 1/2 cups of flour (8oz=1 cup); however, please note, that we have not tested this recipe by volume (using measuring cups) we measured by weight (using a scale). Hope that helps. Cheers!
  • Daniel F
    Daniel F
    If i need to spread the task os making these tarts ahead of time and having say 20min at the day i'd be serving them how should I do it? Can I make the cream and bake the shell day before? Just leave assembly left for that day? What ensure is the closest to making them at the same day? Thanks, Daniel
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    You can absolutely make the shells and pastry cream a day ahead of time, just be sure you have the freshest possible berries for final assembly. The pastry cream is best used when tempered just a bit - as very cold pastry cream can sometimes be a bit tight to work with. Cheers!
  • Diogo B
    Diogo B
    I used to make pate brisee/sucree in the food processor. I put cold butter (I live in a very hot city) and cold flour inside it and mix them until the mixture becomes sandy. Then I add the wet ingredients (egg yolk, milk, etcetera) and pulse until it becomes a ball. I like the result very much, but I would like to know if this method is right for making this kind of dough.
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Sure, you can do this...it is a shortcut but it will work. Just be sure to only let the processor work until the dough is formed, then continue if you need to by hand. ~Ken
  • Diogo B
    Diogo B
    If the filling is going to be moist, such as a custard, or a pear tarte bourdaloue, does the shell need to be partially baked or it can be baked with the filling since the beginning? Thanks!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Yes, often when adding wet ingredients to a pie or tart, the crust is pre-baked to some degree — this is know as blind baking". Cheers!
  • Diogo B
    Diogo B
    If I'm to bake the dough directly from the freezer (not refrigerator), do I need to place a piece of parchment inside each one and then fill with dried baking beans or pie weights? Thank you!
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Yes, the dough should still be weighed down with the parchment and beans because as the dough starts to cook it will still soften and shrink if it is not weighed down. Cheers.
  • Kathleen S
    Kathleen S
    I am really excited about this tart. It is beautiful, delicious and a real show stopper. I plan to serve it again at my next dinner party. I will make the dough in advance and freeze it. The custard will be made the day before. I prefer to do the rest the day of the party. Thank you Rouxbe for another fantastic recipe/lesson. The videos are always helpful.
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Thank you Kathleen. We appreciate how much you are cooking and sharing your love of food with others. ~Ken
  • Suzanne S
    Suzanne S
    I had problems with the pastry cream in this recipe. My sugar and yolk mixture was not as runny as the video, and my cornstarch mixture was pastey. Despite many minurtes vigorous whisking did not liquefy. Once I added the milk to the mixture, it thickened up too much during cooking and I had to add additional warm milk. In looking back at the professional cooking course ratios for custards, the ratio of starch and eggs to liquid is 2tsp: starch 4 egg yolks: 500 ml of liquid. This recipe has 5 TBSP of cornstarch: 4 egg yolks to 500 ml milk. Is this intentional?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Suzanne- Thanks for your message. I might suggest that you try the recipe again and use an extra egg yolk (size can play a part here) and a bit less cornstarch. It sounds like a few factors where at play here. The custard filling in this tart is supposed to be tighter (thicker) than a regular custard, but it sounds like you needed to use less cornstarch as it was paste-like and not a great texture. My suggestion is to try again and use 2 TBSP corn starch as a starting point, not 5. Add more if you think you need it (in a small amount of milk, whisked in). It could be that you need to add another egg yolk as well, but the problem sounds more related to too much starch and not about the thickening from the egg. ~Ken
  • Suzanne S
    Suzanne S
    Thanks for the quick response Ken. I was thinking along the same lines about adding an egg yolk but doubted myself. Thank you for the instructions on how to scale back and adjust the cornstarch. I am still puzzled by the large difference in cornstarch amounts from the standard ratios for stirred custards and what is requiredin this recipe. The amount here is more than three times the ratio. Is that a common increase for stiffer custards
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Yes, for custards that are intended to be be a filling with fruit (which can seep and add moisture), yes... a tighter or thicker custard is the norm. There are no rules about "how thick" it is, it just needs to work well in the desired application. So there is latitude to work with - so find the texture that suits you if you prefer it thinner. Great work in untangling the custard. ~Ken
  • Srirat P
    Srirat P
    When I followed the recipe I was very happy with the result but after refrigerating it overnight I want to have the pastry Crème set firmer. If I would add gelatin how much should I use.
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    Hi Srirat - Thanks for your question. In my experience with gelatin thickened tarts/pies, 1 envelope (1/4 oz.) of unflavored powdered gelatin should do the trick. Thanks! Chef Kirk
  • Srirat P
    Srirat P
    Thank you so much Kirk. I will give it a try :)
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    Super!

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