Boylan's Irish Coffee

Boylan's Irish Coffee

Details

"Only IRISH coffee provides in a single glass all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar, fat." quote from Alex Levine...I'll drink to that!
  • Serves: 1
  • Active Time: 5 mins
  • Total Time: 10 mins
  • Views: 32,474
  • Success: 97%

Steps

Step 1: Making the Coffee

• 3/4 cup brewed strong coffee
• 1 1/2 oz Jameson's Irish Whiskey (or any Irish Whiskey)
• 4 tsp sugar
• 1/3 cup whipping cream

Method

Start by brewing a pot of espresso or really strong coffee.

Measure the whiskey and sugar together in a glass goblet. Add the hot coffee once ready. Whip the cream, stopping just before it reaches the soft peak stage.

Stir the coffee to make sure the sugar has dissolved. Then, using a clean, cold spoon, top with the whipped cream and enjoy!

Chef's Notes

The word whiskey is an Anglicisation of the ancient Gaelic term “uisce beatha” which translates as “water of life”. Although similar to scotch in many ways, the main difference is that Irish whiskey is distilled three times, whereas Scotch is distilled only twice.

Another very important contribution to the difference in flavors of Scotch whisky and Irish whiskey is that in Scotland, the malt is dried over peat fires and comes in contact with the smoke. In Ireland, the malt usually doesn’t come in contact with the smoke. Scotch, therefore, often tastes “peaty” but Irish whiskey almost always doesn’t.

10 Comments

  • Dave R
    Dave R
    In the text version of this recipe (http://rouxbe.com/recipes/191;text), there was a note at the bottom of the page. It read: "The word whiskey is an Anglicisation of the ancient Gaelic term "uisce beatha" which translates as "water of life". Although similar to scotch in many ways, the main difference is that Irish whiskey is distilled three times, whereas Scotch is distilled only twice." I would add: Another very important contribution to the difference in flavors of Scotch whisky and Irish whiskey is that in Scotland, the malt is dried over peat fires and comes in contact with the smoke, and in Ireland, the malt usually doesn`t comes in contact with the smoke. Scotch, therefore, often tastes smoky (we call it `peaty`) but Irish whiskey almost always doesn't, the main exception being Connemara Peated Single Malt Irish Whiskey. Enjoy.
  • Steve E
    Steve E
    Thanks Dave, that was really informative and just the tidbit of info I needed to finish off that explanation. People often ask why can't they use any old whiskey for Irish coffee, there is no reason at all really. There is something about the smoothness of a good Irish Whiskey that works well with coffee and cream that a strong peaty whiskey just doesn't do as well. Besides it wouldn't be Irish coffee with The McCallan or Jack Daniels now would it?
  • Dave R
    Dave R
    No, Steve, it certainly wouldn't be Irish coffee with any other whiskey (or whisky for that matter!). I'll bet, though, that there are other interesting variations on coffee and whiskey out there to be shared. Another bit of information - about the four major producing countries - is that the Irish and American spelling is "whiskey", while the Scots and Canadian spelling is "whisky", ie: without the "e". I hope that's interesting, not confusing.
  • Debra G
    Debra G
    Everyone in the family loved this recipe. No, we didn't have Irish Whisky on hand- and no one was volunteering for the 20 minute drive to the grocery. It was still fantastic and I can't wait to try again!
  • Iain G
    Iain G
    I muddled through with a 12 year old scotch and brown sugar. Holy Mother Mary and Joseph! Just fantastic!
  • Julie N
    Julie N
    Oh, I am so not sure you hit the major food groups, gonna try and forward the recipe to my sis the MD. I think alcohol ad fat are really in the disqualified category. But, the coffee, my partner, he loves it and I am required to make when the weather is really cold (not difficult for Montreal where he lives). Now that autumn is here in New York, it is time to light the fireplace and have something nice and warm to sip. Relax, not worry about....whatever plagues your mind catch and old movie and tune out the noise of civilization. Got quite mellow just writing this. Also, just a touch of orange liqueur adds a little pizazz either in the liquid OR in the whiiping cream, can change this to vanilla, if you prefer.
  • Marcus G
    Marcus G
    If you put more coffee, less cream you can make it look like a (miniature) pint of Guinness. A spoon more sugar and you wont have to whip the cream, it will float on top.
  • Kristen L
    Kristen L
    No family gathering is complete without a good Irish coffee. Delicious, thanks for sharing your version
  • Mark S
    Mark S
    The cream is not whipped. The cream is shaken till it is thick enough to be poured gentely over the back of a round spoon (soup. The spoon should just touch the coffee the vream should form a white head like a pint of Guinness. The pourpose of the cream is to cool the hot coffee as you drink it. Being brne in Ireland I know my Irish coffee's and the whiskey is usually Bushmills or Jameson. Slainte! Mark
  • Joe G Rouxbe Staff
    Joe G
    Clearly you understand how important the cream stage is. Shaking the cream is a good idea and will produce the same results. Most people over whip the cream which completely changes this beverage. Take note from Mark everyone! BTW...The name Boyland came from our great friends in Ireland who came to Canada and taught us this recipe :-).

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