Madeleines

Madeleines

Details

Madeleines are shell-shaped, soft and moist mini cakes with lightly-crisped edges.
  • Serves: 3 dozen
  • Active Time: 35 mins
  • Total Time: 45 mins
  • Views: 26,159
  • Success Rating: 100% (?)
    0% - I fed it to the dog
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Steps

Step 1: Preparing Your Pan

• madeleine pan

Method

To make traditionally shaped madeleines, you need to have a madeleine pan.

Step 2: Preparing Your Mise en Place

• 8 oz unsalted butter (room temperature)
• 8 oz sugar
• 1 tsp vanilla
• 1 tsp lemon zest
• 8 oz all-purpose flour*
• 2 tsp baking powder
• pinch of salt
• 4 large eggs

Method

To prepare your mise en place, measure out the butter. Make sure it has come to room temperature and it is soft.

Measure out the sugar, vanilla and lemon zest. Measure out the flour, baking powder and salt and sift together.

Gather the eggs and set aside.

Preheat your oven to 350° F (175° C).

Step 3: Starting the Batter

Method

Place the butter into the bowl of a stand mixer. Using the paddle attachment, cream the butter on medium speed. Add the sugar, vanilla and lemon zest while mixing. Scrape the bowl down to make sure everything is evenly combined.

Step 4: Adding the Eggs and Flour

Method

Add two of the eggs and mix until fully incorporated. Turn the speed down to slow and add half of the flour. Once it is combined, add the remaining eggs and blend again. Finally, add the last of the flour and mix just until fully combined.

Step 5: Preparing the Batter for Piping

Method

Using a rubber spatula, remove the excess batter from the paddle. Scrape the sides of the bowl down and give the batter one last gentle mix.

Place a large, round tip (804 or 805) into a pastry bag and lock. Fill the bag with the batter and close.

Step 6: Piping the Batter

Method

If the madeleine pan is not non-stick, make sure to grease and lightly flour the pan prior to piping.

Pipe the batter into each mould, filling it only about two-thirds full. Alternatively, you could use a spoon to fill the moulds.

Step 7: Baking the Madeleines

Method

Bake the madeleines for approximately 8 to 10 minutes or until the top is humped and lightly golden. The hump on the back of a madeleine is very characteristic of these little cakes.

Step 8: Removing the Madeleines

Method

Once the madeleines come out of the oven, let sit for a minute or so before popping out of the moulds. If they cool in the moulds, they will continue to bake from the heat of the pan and become dry.

Step 9: Cooling & Serving

Method

Allow the madeleines to cool slightly on a cooling rack. Madeleines are best served fresh and warm.

Step 10: Dusting with Icing Sugar (optional)

Method

If desired, the madeleines can be dusted with a bit of icing sugar. Let them cool completely before doing this.

Chef's Notes

*For a slightly nutty flavor, substitute 3 ounces of the flour with finely ground almonds or hazelnuts.

Madeleines are best eaten fresh and even more delicious when served slightly warm, so you don’t need to wait for them to cool completely.

The batter can stored in the fridge for up to 4 days, so you can have fresh madeleines at any time during the week.

18 Comments

  • Alka K
    Alka K
    how to make the batter if we do not eat eggs
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Hi Alka, This recipe relies on eggs in order to leaven the product. There is no substitution, that I am aware of, that will provide the same result. Unfortunately, if you are allergic to eggs, this is one of those recipes that you might have to pass on. Usually, if a recipe calls for only one egg, the egg is likely there to just bind the ingredients together. In this case, substitutions can often be made (sometimes ground flax seed, banana or apple sauce). However, recipes that call for 2 or more eggs will most likely rely on their leavening power in order for the product to rise properly. Hope this helps!
  • Paddy L
    Paddy L
    I usually make a genoise-type batter for madeleines, with melted butter. The batter sits for 20 to 30 minutes after mixing to ensure the little hump on the top of each cake after baking. Are these cakier?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Hi Paddy, There are many recipe variations for the Madeleine. The genoise-style will likely be a bit lighter than this one but, for some, genoise can be more difficult to make. This recipe isn't too technical but it is still delicious. We'll definitely be covering genoise down the road in the cooking school. You might want to try this recipe out and compare, but if you're happy with the recipe you have, that's all that matters. Yum! I could eat one right now with my coffee.
  • Caroline D
    Caroline D
    is there such a thing of over creaming the butter? what is the key to the recipe so that the madeleine are perfect? Probably the flour
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Yes, there is a balance when it comes to creaming butter and sugar. You want to incorporate enough air into the mixture to make the final product light, but you shouldn't push it to its limits. The more the mixture is whipped, the cakier the product will be; but, if it is over-creamed, the Madeleines may wind up collapsing in the oven. If not enough air is incorporated, the product will be denser because it won't rise as well as it could. We will get more into this subject when we cover more baking lessons in the school. Basically though, it comes down to practice. This might mean that you divide the formula in half and test out both ends of the scale (whip less and whip more). This way, you will see how mixing has an impact on the final result. Cheers!
  • Caroline D
    Caroline D
    thanks for the vital information. What should the butter look like, and how do I know I have incorporated enough air into the mixture?
  • Kimberley S Rouxbe Staff
    Kimberley S
    Beat the butter until it is smooth and then add in the sugar, etc. as described in Step 3. The mixture should be light and fluffy and take on a pale color. Make sure that the butter is at room temperature so it can easily trap the air. Cheers!
  • Liliane
    Liliane
    Hi..You state that these are best eaten when fresh and warm...Can these be frozen.and if so for how long? would that change the taste?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Liliane- These can be frozen, but they really are best eaten fresh. If you do need to freeze them: let them cool completely, wrap them well, label and date the outside, and eat them within a few weeks if possible. The taste may be a bit muted and the texture not as fine, but they will still be OK. I hope this helps! Enjoy.
  • Liliane
    Liliane
    Hi ..what would conversion be for 8 oz of sugar and flour? Would it be 1 cup of each? Also can I use cake flour?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Liliane- Yes, 8 ounces is equal to 1 cup. Cake flour would be great - but it's not necessary in this recipe. Let us know how they turn out, ok? Cheers.
  • Liliane
    Liliane
    Hi. If I didnt let butter soften ahead of time. Can I microwave it for 10the seconds to soften prior to using it in recipie?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi- Yes, that is a good option...just to get it soft, not melted. I hope this helps!
  • Liliane
    Liliane
    Thank you for all your input! I have baked these. Just as you said..They do taste like mini soft cakes. I have frozen them so that I can display them on a cookie tray as a hostess gift for Fathers day...Thank u so much!
  •  ahn F
    ahn F
    I was watching a you tube video by the College of DuPage "In the Kitchen with Chris," where the chef uses a recipe for a standard Madeleine cookie, and he adds that if you want a much lighter cookie, double the butter in the recipe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLVKUHsbk9c Unfortunately, the said recipe was not available on the link they offered. Would adding more butter to this recipe make these cake/cookies lighter?
  • Kasey  J
    Kasey J
    Hello! Thank you for posting this recipe. I recently made them and was very disappointed. They basically just flattened out. I understand that they are suppose to be light and fluffy, but mine were mostly all bubbles with not a lot of cake. I wondered if you had any tips or suggestions of what I can do differently next time. Thank you!
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    Hi Kasey and thanks for your comments. Don't be too hard on yourself as Madeleines are really challenging and take time to perfect - but definitely worth the effort in the long run. Karen above, actually says is the best when she states - "...there is a balance when it comes to creaming butter and sugar. You want to incorporate enough air into the mixture to make the final product light, but you shouldn't push it to its limits. The more the mixture is whipped, the cakier the product will be; but, if it is over-creamed, the Madeleines may wind up collapsing in the oven. If not enough air is incorporated, the product will be denser because it won't rise as well as it could. Basically though, it comes down to practice. This might mean that you divide the formula in half and test out both ends of the scale (whip less and whip more). This way, you will see how mixing has an impact on the final result". Kasey, there's not much I can add to Karen's response other than practice makes perfect. Our kids love Madeleines so we continue to try and try to make them perfect at home but we also have issues, especially at high altitude in Colorado. Keep trying your best and keep me posted!!! Love the craft. Thanks for learning with Rouxbe. Chef Kirk

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