Roasted Garlic & Onion Buttah

Roasted Garlic & Onion Buttah

Details

This recipe will increase the flavor of any dish. You can add it to soups or sauces, toss it with pasta, put it on top of garlic bread or mashed potatoes, or just put a scoop in your beans as they cook.
  • Serves: 4 cups
  • Active Time: 45 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hr 30 mins
  • Views: 39,802
  • Success Rating: 81% (?)
    0% - I fed it to the dog
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Steps

Step 1: Preparing the Flavor Base

• 1/4 cup raw garlic, peeled
• 2 cups shallot or white onion, peeled and cubed
• 2 to 3 cups vegetable stock, heated
• 2 sprigs fresh rosemary or fresh thyme
• freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Method

Preheat oven to 400°F (205°C).

First, gather and prepare your mise en place.

To prepare the flavor base, in a casserole dish, pour in the garlic and onion. Add vegetable stock until garlic and onion are just barely floating. The liquid should cover them completely. Add the herbs and freshly–ground black pepper.

Place the dish in the oven, and cook for approximately 35 to 40 minutes. Be sure to check every 15 minutes or so to ensure you do not burn the edges at all. Be careful, since burnt garlic can make this dish bitter. Stir occasionally if needed.

Remove the casserole dish from the oven as soon as all liquid has nearly evaporated and the onion and garlic are just caramelized. Remove the herb sprigs.

Step 2: Finishing the Buttah

• 1 1/2 cup raw cashews, soaked in 3 to 4 cups of warm water until softened, then drained
• 1/4 cup non–dairy milk

Method

To finish the buttah, in a food processor, add the roasted onions and garlic, cashews and non–dairy milk. Blend until smooth.

Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator. For longer storage you can place the buttah in ice cube trays or larger blocks in the freezer for later use.

Add to cooked potatoes for a wonderful oil free, low–sodium mash, or spread on your favorite whole grain bread or for a healthy twist on garlic bread.

44 Comments

  • Bonnie D
    Bonnie D
    I just discovered this little gem of a staple and bookmarked it for my To Make list. I like that it can be made on a batch day and then portioned and frozen for use when needed. Can't wait to give this a try. I will report back when I do. Thank you!
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Enjoy it- And find creative ways to add it to foods to bump up flavor and richness. ~Ken
  • Dwayne E
    Dwayne E
    Just a question on the properties of non dairy milk. I have seen a few recipes so far that suggest non dairy milk, Is this for cooking purposes , in other words, can dairy be used in these recipes? Dwayne
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    You can surely use dairy milk if you'd like as a substitution - these recipes were designed to help instruction in plant-based cooking and eating (which includes no dairy). ~Ken
  • Clau M
    Clau M
    Hello, I would love to know what is the brand and model of the food processor in this recipe. I have searched for one with stainless steel cup I can't find any... Thank you !
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Clau- That is a Blixer, made by Robot Coupe. As you can see, it's a great device. ~Ken
  • Lisa D
    Lisa D
    could you substitute white beans instead of cashews? Or any substitutions? If so, how much?
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    Hi Lisa - Thanks for your question and learning with Rouxbe. I'd say that as long as you maintain the consistency and texture that makes the recipe excellent, you can substitute the white beans for the cashews. The beans may provide a thicker or denser texture than the cashews - I recommend being prepared to adjust the consistency with more or less vegetable stock, if necessary. I hope this helps - happy cooking with Rouxbe! Chef Kirk
  • Sharon  K
    Sharon K
    Hi Lisa, I am a student in this course and a raw vegan chef. I do not eat cashews. Cashews contain the chemical urushiol, which is the same toxin you find in poison ivy. I soaked organic raw almonds for 8-12 hours, drain and add hot water for a quick pre-soak before peeling. I use them for a similar texture profile instead of the cashews in cheeses and cream recipes. Remember to start with a lesser amount of water and add it incrementally. Be sure to use your spatula to assimilate the mixture. Good luck!
  • Lisa D
    Lisa D
    I just bought a vitamix -- first recipe I made in it. Loved how it came out. Just tried it on toast now making mashed potatoes. So excited.
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    Thanks Lisa - sounds amazing! Have fun! Chef Kirk
  • Chris P
    Chris P
    Haha! I was just telling my husband I rarely like how these kinds of recipes taste (as my garlic onions were cooking in the oven). Well, I just finished the buttah and the potatoes and all I can say is WOW!!! This is a winner. And the fact that it is wholesome is fantastic!!! Living in Spain, sometimes feel so far away from wonderful products I could get in the states, but this is easy and available for me to make any time. I love it! I was wondering if the buttah could be thinned to use like an Alfredo sauce? Would I just add a bit more milk to thin it out and pour on top of pasta?
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    Hi Chris and thanks so much for your amazing comments - and yes, indeed, feel free to use as your Alfredo base - perhaps try a little first and then decide on the right proportion for your desired flavor profile! It's also nice to spread on crusty bread with a nice glass of Rioja! Enjoy and Cheers! Chef Kirk
  • Amy B
    Amy B
    How long with the buttah keep in the frig?
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    I Amy - so in my experience, Buttah tends to stay fresh for perhaps a couple of weeks in the fridge/as much as 3 months in the freezer. Give or take. I hope this helps! Take care, Chef Kirk
  • Linda W
    Linda W
    What substitute do you recommend for cashews in this buttah? My daughter is allergic to them.
  • Lauren L Rouxbe Staff
    Lauren L
    Hi Linda. Thank you for your question. Cashews are a super common allergy. In place of cashews, my first choice would be pine nuts followed by macadamias. Enjoy! Lauren
  • Whitney C
    Whitney C
    Hello, I made a large batch of this buttah and stored it in the freezer about two weeks ago. I allowed the frozen buttah to thaw in the fridge overnight and used part if it in a recipe today. There is still some left that I haven't used up. It is thawed and in the refrigerator. Is it okay to store it in the fridge after freezing it or should it be used immediately? Thank you for your help!
  • Eric W Rouxbe Staff
    Eric W
    Whitney, the total shelf life in the refrigerator for many cooked food is about one week. When counting these days, include the before and after freezing. Note that some foods may have a shorter or longer shelf life due to various factors that influence spoilage bacteria count. Therefore, it is important to use all your senses to evaluate leftover foods as they approach the one week mark.
  • Meenachi J
    Meenachi J
    instead of using cashew nuts, can we use peanuts instead for a change
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Meenachi- Other nuts will offer a more distinct flavor profile whereas the cashews are more neutral and still yield an easily blended final product. You might experiment a bit and see what suits your palate! ~Ken
  • Pablo A
    Pablo A
    Wow!! It turned out so good that makes me feel like a real chef, thanks for such an awesome recipe.
  • Sunnie S
    Sunnie S
    This buttah is quite delicious! I was surprised at how much sweetness it had to it. I suppose that is the magic of slow cooking the garlic and onion! I used 3 C of veggie stock and I needed to keep mine in the oven for much longer than 45 minutes to allow the liquid to evaporate. I kept it in the oven for close to an hour and a half. I also found the buttah to be a thinner than I would have liked, so, I will use less non dairy milk next time (and perhaps reduce my veggie stock to 2- 2/12 C to reduce the cooking time). I enjoyed mine on a nice french baguette, but will be adding into my next batch of mashed potatoes and also over pasta and veggies!
  • Lauren L Rouxbe Staff
    Lauren L
    Thanks, Sunnie! Great work paying attention and adapting as you go. Thanks for the feedback. Lauren
  • Julie H
    Julie H
    This is a recipe I have returned to over and over since finishing the cooking course late last year. There are almost endless uses for this - I use it often when sour cream is suggested as a topping; I’ve topped toast with it as a kind of “biscuit and gravy”; on top of baked potatoes and any grain/veggie combo. I freeze approx 2/3 of the recipe in two separate containers and portion out the rest in one or two containers for the fridge (just based on however many containers I have available right then). This is now part of my weekly batch/prep day. SO GOOD Thanks for the recipe!!
  • Char N Rouxbe Staff
    Char N
    Hi, Julie: Everyone seems to enjoy this recipe. It is a perfect alternative to commercially made products of this nature.Great flavor and so many practical uses. So glad that you have enjoyed this delicious recipe! Others will be happy to know that it freezes well. Happy cooking! Char
  • Sherry B
    Sherry B
    I have made this and it really adds so much flavor to different dishes. Actually making my second batch.
  • Char N Rouxbe Staff
    Char N
    Hi Sherry: Thanks for writing. We love hearing how this recipe for "buttah" is enjoyed. Congrats on making your second batch! It is a very popular flavor enhancer for so many dishes! Cheers, Char
  • Melissa S
    Melissa S
    I had just made the roasted cauliflower with lime, cilantro and chili, and right after made this buttah. I used a big leek rather than onion because I needed to use it. I poured the measured broth into the bowl I had mixed the cauliflower in to pick up on the flavorable seasonings that were left behind in the bowl. Gave it extra flavor. So glad to have this recipe!
  • Char N Rouxbe Staff
    Char N
    Hi Melissa-- that sounds delicious! It is always a kitchen victory when flavor and fiber unite! Thanks for sharing your kitchen experiences with us! Who doesn't love leeks?! Cheers, Char
  • Darcy S
    Darcy S
    Wow - this is amazing! My husband is always asking for "good" mashed potatoes, but I don't want to use the added dairy or oil. This really did the trick! He loved the creamy texture and overall flavor - I loved that I could use "buttah" and make both of us happy! Thanks so much, Darcy
  • Char N Rouxbe Staff
    Char N
    Hi Darcy: We always love hearing such fabulous news like yours! The "buttah" is also delicious on a beautiful, rustic loaf of homemade bread. Thanks for writing. Make a few jars for your friends! Take care, Char
  • Robert W
    Robert W
    Actually, it's the shells of cashews that have urushiol. Even those labelled "raw" have been treated with heat and/or steam to remove the shells and detoxify the bad shell chemicals. There is no urushiol in the cashews you purchase and there are no shells either. However, they're pretty fatty.
  • Char N Rouxbe Staff
    Char N
    Hello Robert--thanks for providing us with your information about urushiol. One of my favorite dried fruits is "caju." Lots of interesting facts about the cashew, which as you have stated, can be very fatty. To substitute the cashews, a white bean is a good substitute. Appreciate hearing from you. Cheers, Char
  • Margaret K
    Margaret K
    I was surprised at how much flavour this sauce/spread/dip/soup or vegetable enhancer has! I kept licking it off the spatula as I was preparing it for the freezer. It is really delicious and I see so many uses for it. I really never expected it to have such a deep, rich flavour. Thank you for this!!
  • Char N Rouxbe Staff
    Char N
    Hello, Margaret— this is quite an amazing and delicious recipe. Glad that the recipe went above and beyond your expectations for a delicious “buttah.” Thanks for writing. Cheers, Char
  • Sara S
    Sara S
    What if I don't like onions? Do I just leave them out and/or add more garlic, or should I substitute with something else?
  • Char N Rouxbe Staff
    Char N
    Hi Sara: thanks for writing. Once the onions are roasted, they do acquire a sweet taste. However, if you do not like onions, I would suggest to roast leeks, they have an onion flavor, but not as strong. Or you can look to "soft onions," like Walla-Walla or Vidalia, which are sweet. I hope this is helpful to you. Cheers, Char
  • Laura V
    Laura V
    What is the texture after it is put in the refrigerator? Does it firm up considerably?
  • Eric W Rouxbe Staff
    Eric W
    Laura, it will firm up some, but it will depend on how much liquid is incorporated. You can control this.
  • Carmen F
    Carmen F
    Definitely a staple in our household since the first part of our course.
  • Wanda S
    Wanda S
    I made the onion and garlic buttah but used dried basil (hand rubbed) in the place of black pepper and it turned out good. Is there anything else that can be used in the place of black pepper? I also made mashed pototoes without butter/margarine with some gravy without oil. They all turned out well. First I ate some potatoes with gravy on top, then compared it to the potatoes with the buttah in it. I immediately noticed the difference! The flavor "popped" and kicked it up a notch.
  • Jeanette D
    Jeanette D
    THX
  • Dianna S
    Dianna S
    Hello, I just finished listening to Chef Dan Marek and it was mentioned there is another recipe for traditional butter here at Rouxbe, though I am unable to locate it. If you can kindly help that would be great. I would like to start making this at home. I find the shop bought products just have so many preservatives. With much gratitude Dianna

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