Rich Caramel Sauce

Caramel sauce s1 ver2 hd1280
This rich caramel sauce contains only 3 simple ingredients: sugar, cream and butter. It goes perfectly with ice cream, tarts, cakes and even French toast.
  • Serves: 8 to 12
  • Active Time: 20 mins
  • Total Time: 20 mins
  • Views: 52,239
  • Success: 95%

Step 1: Making the Sauce

• 1 1/2 cups sugar
• 3/4 cup water
• 1 cup heavy cream
• 2 tbsp salted butter

Method

NOTE: IF YOU HAVE NOT MADE CARAMEL SAUCE BEFORE, PLEASE BE VERY CAREFUL. THE SUGAR IS EXTREMELY HOT AND CAN CAUSE SEVERE BURNS.

In a medium pot, boil the sugar and water together over medium to low heat until the sugar caramelizes and turns golden brown. Be sure not to stir the mixture as the sugar heats.

This will take approximately 7 to 15 minutes.

Once the sugar is golden, immediately remove the pot from the stove and carefully whisk in the cream. Wear oven mitts and be very careful. The cold cream will splatter when it hits the hot sugar. Once the cream has been added, whisk in the butter one tablespoon at a time. Then set the caramel aside to cool slightly as it will still be very hot.

Serve warm or at room temperature with cakes, tarts, ice cream or even French toast. Any leftover caramel sauce can be kept in a plastic container or squeeze bottle and stored in the refrigerator for quite a few days.

Note: Instead of using salted butter, you can use unsalted butter and season the sauce at the end with a bit of fleur de sel or gray salt.


Chef's Notes

Homemade caramel sauce has a rich, buttery nutty flavor that will leave you craving more…

When you caramelize sugar be sure to give it your undivided attention. It can turn from clear liquid to burnt caramel in a matter of seconds. At 350° degrees it is also very hot and can cause severe burning if you are not careful.

Only granulated sugar can be successfully caramelized; brown sugar and powdered sugars contain impurities that inhibit caramelization.
Also, make sure your pan and utensils are very clean because any food particles could cause the sugar to crystallize.



To prevent crystallization you can also add an interfering agent; just a tiny amount of acid will do, such as cream of tartar or a drop of lemon juice.



And remember, don’t be intimidated. Even experienced chefs sometimes burn the caramel or have the sugar crystallize on them.