Brown Sugar & Thyme Pork Chops

Brown Sugar & Thyme Pork Chops

Details

Pan-fried, moist and juicy pork chops are first marinated in a combination of brown sugar, thyme, toasted cumin seeds, garlic and apple cider vinegar.
  • Serves: 4
  • Active Time: 25 mins
  • Total Time: 4 hrs
  • Views: 31,397
  • Success: 95%

Steps

Step 1: Preparing the Marinade & Marinating

• 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar
• 9 tbsp grapeseed oil
• 2 garlic cloves
• 1 tsp cumin seeds
• 2 tsp fresh thyme
• 2 tbsp brown sugar (maple syrup or honey)
• 4 pork chops
• kosher salt (to taste)
• freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

Method

To prepare the marinade, first toast the cumin seeds in a small pan over low heat until fragrant. Mince the garlic and remove the leaves from the thyme.

Place all of the ingredients into a bowl and whisk to combine. Taste the marinade and adjust the flavors to your liking.

Season both sides of the pork chops with salt and pepper to taste. Place the pork chops into a shallow dish and pour the marinade over top. Turn the meat to thoroughly coat. Cover and marinate in the refrigerator for 2 to 4 hours.

Step 2: Cooking the Pork & Serving

• 2 to 3 tsp grapeseed oil

Method

Preheat a large, stainless-steel pan over medium-high heat. Drain the pork chops and lightly pat dry with paper towel to remove any excess marinade. Discard the marinade.

Once the pan is ready, add the oil to the pan, followed by the pork chops. Lower the heat to medium and use the flip often method to cook the pork chops. Cook the pork chops for approximately 8 to 10 minutes or until just cooked through (the pork can be a tiny bit pink inside).

Once done, transfer to a plate and cover with vented foil to rest. Once rested, serve immediately. You may even want to make a pan sauce to accompany the pork.

27 Comments

  • Brittany K
    Brittany K
    What flavor does the grapeseed oil give the dish? Can I substitute with olive or vegetable oil?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    We usually use grapeseed oil because it is neutral in flavor and has a high smoking point. Other neutral-tasting oils or olive oil can be used, if desired. Cheers!
  • Brittany K
    Brittany K
    Thank you for answering! What difference does it make to sear something in oil versus butter?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Just curious, have you watched the pan frying lesson? Some of this information is covered in that lesson. Cheers!
  • Brittany K
    Brittany K
    I watched it a while ago. I guess it's time for a review.... :)
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Ah yes, it's funny how we all (including myself) need a refresher sometimes :-) Sometimes it's not until we watch a lesson a few times that we pick up all of the different things that were talked about. Cheers!
  • Brittany K
    Brittany K
    I guess that goes to prove the axiom that you never stop learning until you die, and even then it's questionable!
  • Kristine B
    Kristine B
    This was my first Rouxbe recipe to practice my pan frying and I am amazed at how good it was. The chops were perfectly cooked, juicy with a nice brown crust. With a heaping side of the Creamy Mashed Potatoes - to die for.
  • Ken R
    Ken R
    Can pork chops be tempered before cooking? I know you recommend this for premium steaks, but advise against it for chicken because it's a health issue. I haven't been able to find anything on the site about what you recommend for pork chops.
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Indeed, tempering pork chops for a half an hour or so is a good idea. Cheers!
  • Jeanne M
    Jeanne M
    Is there some trick to telling if a package of pork chops will likely turn out tougher or more tender? I've been making pork chops using the pan frying technique. The first times were great. I marinated the pork chops both times before cooking, the first time using this marinade. This time I brined the pork chops. They were super tasty, but they were tough. I cooked them till they were still just a little pink inside. Not sure I would want to cook them much less. What should I keep in mind when I am shopping for pork? I'm pretty proud of myself though, tough pork notwithstanding. I made a brine based on 30 grams of salt to a quart of apple juice, added garlic, onion, a cinnamon stick, whole allspice berries, clove, and a few cardamom pods as well as peppercorns and a bay leaf. I boiled the brine and let it steep to infuse the flavors. Later, I brined the chops for 30 minutes. After panfrying, I made a pan sauce of shallot, white dry vermouth, homemade chicken stock, all reduced and mounted with butter to finish. The flavors were delicious. I was going to post this under the ingredients category of the forum, but was unable to start a new discussion. Maybe a glitch? Thanks!
  • Liz S
    Liz S
    Your brine and pan sauce sounds delicious Jeanne. My personal experience has been that I used to buy loin chops or double loin thinking I was buying the best because they were the most expensive. Now I only buy rib chops as they have lots more fat and flavour . I have some slow roasting in the oven right now after browning them, then browning onions, carrots and garlic, adding some flour and deglazing with white wine and homemade chicken stock. My husband fast fries them and also barbecues them with great success.
  • Jeanne M
    Jeanne M
    Thanks, Liz, it was good. I'm going to take a closer look at the pork chops in the market and see what's available. These were called center cut loin pork chops, boneless, like in the video, regular thickness, not super thin, but not thick cut either.
  • Michelle B
    Michelle B
    I can't seem to find a grocery store that carries cumin seeds. Can I use a little ground cumin for the marinade, or will that mess up the recipe? Thanks, Michelle
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    You could use a bit of cumin powder. But next time you see cumin seeds be sure to pick some up as using the whole seed rather than powdered does make a difference, especially when cooking certain dishes. Cheers!
  • Frank R
    Frank R
    I picked up a whole pork loin yesterday at my local grocery store. I was hoping watch a Rouxbe video on how to break down that cut of meat, however had to restort to youtube. After breaking it down, I dove into this recipe, and it turned out amazing. I really enjoyed this dish, full of flavor, the shops were nice and moist, and it was amazing simply to make
  • Eric H
    Eric H
    Looking forward to trying this recipe tonight and saw the recommendation for a pan sauce at the end. I'd like to try that too, but am looking for some suggestions on a good, complimentary sauce.. ...was thinking similar to that used in the chicken marsala, but with white wine instead of marsala? What do ya'll think??
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    Sounds like you are/were on the right track. For more recommendations, you may want to check out the lesson on Pan Sauces. Experimenting with different acids and flavor combinations is where cooking becomes fun. Cheers!
  • Snow F
    Snow F
    My second recipe made and another big hit. They came out great, so juicy and flavorful. This is going on my favorites list.
  • Adam B
    Adam B
    I tried this recipe last night and the chops turned out great! The marinade worked perfectly and they were tasty and moist. I noticed that the Medium-High to Medium heat ended up burning the sucs in the bottom of the pan. Could this be because I didn't wipe off enough of the marinade when I patted the chops dry? I cook chicken in the same pan, the same way (with grapeseed oil), and the sucs normally turn out perfect. I ended up making a pan sauce with the juices from the chops after they rested and it turned out wonderful. Just wondering what I could do next time to use the sucs for the sauce.
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hello- First, great news on the chops! I'm glad they worked out for you. Your description does seem to indicate that there may have been a bit of excess marinade. The brown sugar is sure to burn if too hot, so the combination of a bit too much sugar and the heat may have caused this. Next time, consider patting the chops dry and even let them sit on paper towel for a few minutes. If you see the coloration going from golden to brown to black (i.e. burnt) then reduce the heat and keep a close eye. If that doesn't work then try to finish the chops in a hot oven for a few minutes in a clean pan and then combine the contents of both pans to make the sauce (hopefully you'll have nice sucs in the initial pan if it didn't get too hot). I hope this helps! Enjoy.
  • Jesse G
    Jesse G
    I have not thought once about paying the dues once I really got into this site. The recipes here are elevated higher than what you find on the random cooking website or TV show's website. These pork chops were a delight! They were sweet, moist and quite tender! Usually when I sauté pork chops, they're dry, this definitely wasn't the case! I didn't have cumin seeds, so I did use cumin powder. I am going to try the seeds the next time--I'm sure it'll give a pinch more depth. Thanks again!
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Jesse- Thank you for the kind words about Rouxbe. Cumin seeds are very inexpensive and they will certainly add more depth than ground seed, especially if the ground seeds were not ground fresh in the first place. Let us know when you try the recipe again, we look forward to hearing about another success. Enjoy!
  • Liliane
    Liliane
    I will pick up cumin seeds in future. due to severe weather conditions I need to use what I have in pantry today. how much cumin powder could I use . also how much dried thyme could I use as I do not have any fresh thyme today? would these substitutes make a drastic difference?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Liliane- Use slightly less ground cumin and about half as much dried thyme. That is a good starting point- but the only way to really know is to prepare the dish. Add a bit more of each if you feel it needs it.... but anytime you change a recipe you have to use your best judgement and rely on a bit of trial and error. Good luck!
  • Liliane
    Liliane
    Should I be checking internal temperature of pork chop when done? and if so what would ideal internal temperature be?
  • Dawn T Rouxbe Staff
    Dawn T
    No, you do not need to check the internal temperature. For most folks, they prefer their pork chops a bit pink on the inside; however this is really up to you. To test—once you think they are done, or close to being done—make a small cut into the thickest chop too see how it looks. Hope that helps. Cheers!

Leave A Comment

Please login or join the Rouxbe community to leave a comment.