BBQ Glazed Seitan Brisket

Bbq Glazed Seitan Brisket

Details

This slow-food dinner can be a wonderful addition to a holiday meal, or a Sunday night dinner around the table with family.
  • Serves: 6
  • Active Time: 1 hr 30 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hr 30 mins
  • Views: 22,580
  • Success Rating: 90% (?)
    0% - I fed it to the dog
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Steps

Step 1: Preparing the Seitan Dough

• 2 3/4 cups Base Seitan Dry Mix
• 1/4 cup dried mushroom powder (dried mushrooms ground in a spice grinder)
• 2 tsp chipotle powder
• 3/4 cup tomato paste
• 1/3 cup maple syrup
• 1 1/2 cup marsala wine
• 2 tsp vegan Worcestershire sauce
• 1 tsp liquid smoke
• 2 1/2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
• 1/2 cup tamari
• 3 1/2 cups vegetable stock

Method

Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C)

First, prepare your mise en place, including the Seitan Base Mix.

In a bowl, mix together the Base Seitan Dry mix, mushroom powder and chipotle powder, then set aside while you prepare the liquid mixture.

In separate bowl, mix the liquid ingredients, reserving 1 cup of the vegetable stock and whisk well to ensure all is mixed thoroughly. Add the rest of the vegetable stock and thoroughly combine.

To make the seitan dough, create a well in the dry mixture and gradually add a little less than HALF of the wet mixture. Stir and continue to add very small amounts of liquid until you reach a very elastic dough-like consistency. If your raw dough tears apart easily, this means too much liquid has been added. The raw dough should be very tough to pull apart. Reserve the remaining half of the wet mixture, which will be used later for the braising liquid and glaze.

Next sprinkle the countertop with some of the dry seiten mix. Place the dough onto the countertop and liberally sprinkle with a bit more dry mix. In the case of seitan, kneading is done to help shape and create texture in the dough and not to develop gluten. If you have the right ratio of wet to dry, you should be able to stretch the dough, without it tearing too easily.

Step 2: Braising the Seitan Brisket

Method

To prepare the seitan for braising, lightly coat a casserole dish with oil or spray oil. Begin to stretch and flatten the dough until it is about an inch thick. Place the seitan into the casserole dish and then flip, to lightly coat it in the oil. Pour most of the remaining liquid into the casserole dish and then flip the seitan, to coat it in the liquid.

Bake in the preheated oven for 30 minutes, or until the seitan has started to brown. Carefully, flip the seitan and baste with some of the surrounding liquid. Place back into the oven and continue to cook for another hour or so.

Continue to flip and baste the seitan every 15 minutes. As the dish cooks, the sauce will reduce and thicken into a nice glaze. When done, the seitan should be firm to the touch. Remove from the oven and allow to firm up for a few minutes.

To serve the seitan, slice into thin pieces. The seitan will be slippery from the glaze, so be careful as you cut.

Serve with sides such as mashed potatoes or greens.

23 Comments

  • Divina C
    Divina C
    Any suggestions for leffovers of this dish? I guess Shepherd's Pie could be one of them? Thanks
  • Chad S Rouxbe Staff
    Chad S
    This brisket is very versatile. Being a very dense seitan, if grinding it into a 'ground brisket' there are many applications. Shepherds pie is a great choice, but also this can be a savory base for burgers, meatballs, base for Bolognese, taco meat, pepper steak sandwiches, etc. Keep in mind is that the glaze for the brisket is quite sweet which will also come through in other uses. Hope that is helpful. Cheers, Chad
  • Sandra B
    Sandra B
    I am having a couple of issues with this recipe. I know there is probably something very simple that I am doing wrong. I find it falls apart when trying to flip as shown in the video. It takes many utensils to flip. I have tried changing the ratio of liquid to dry ingredients but to no avail. Also, I don't think I am kneading it long enough as it breaks apart too easily when getting ready to shape for braising. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. It is a great addition to our sunday dinner meals as I am vegan and my husband still enjoys red meat a couple of times a week.. Great middle ground meal :-)
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    The simplest thing to do is make 2 smaller loafs. They will be easier to flip. They may fall apart if too moist, dry, or thin (a thick piece of protein has more strength). It should be very resilient as it's basically a mass of protein. Are you sure you are following the instructions and using the proper vital gluten "flour"? We have not had this issue come up before. ~Ken
  • Sandra B
    Sandra B
    I have made this on 3 occasions now Ken but can't seem to quite get the recipe to act like is shown in the video.. I did ask other classmates on our Facebook group and it seems I am not the only one with similar issues with the recipe.. I did comment that next time I will try splitting the recipe in two and making 2 separate batches and see what happens.. One thing i would like to mention is that in the video it tells us to use some of the dry seitan mix to sprinkle the counter with etc but in the text recipe it does not mention keeping a portion of the dry mix aside for this reason..
  • Laura C
    Laura C
    I am having the same problems as Sandra... i am wondering if the brand of the vital wheat gluten has anything to do with the problem. I bought Arrowhead Mills.... I am used to making bread and I have made seitan before with the older method of washing the flour and the feeling of this dough does not compare to the strong, elastic texture of the gluten. I will switch brands next time and see if that solves the issue. I hope for now that the seitan holds in the oven when I attempt to flip it.
  • Chad S Rouxbe Staff
    Chad S
    This may be an issue with the type of vital wheat gluten. It seems that some people have a hard time with the end texture of this dish, while many have made it with success. There may be a couple factors that make the seitan very fragile to keep in mind and possibly trouble shoot when making it again. - The brand of vital wheat gluten may differ in protein %, which will ultimately make the dough more fragile. - If too much liquid was added to the dry batch to form the dough. The texture before baking should still be very tough and not able to tear apart easily, as the video suggests. - I too much liquid is added to braise when cooking the seitan. In the instructions we suggest using most but not all the liquid to braise in, this could be just poured up to the top of the seitan and not fully covering it, if too much liquid is used then the final dish will be quite soft. You want to crisp the top of the brisket each time before you flip it rather than it being covered with liquid. - Also, as Ken suggests - for flipping challenges you can split this recipe in two if needed or by using a spatula lift from bottom of dish and use two sets of tongs to flip - this seems to be easiest method. Given those factors, try the recipe again, keeping those in mind to see if the outcome is different. I hope that is helpful - Cheers, Chad
  • Laura C
    Laura C
    Thanks Chad. I think the issue is, in this case, as you pointed out, a low content of protein in the vital gluten. As Ken suggested, I did cut the dough in half and was able to flip it but the dough wanted to fall apart. When I flipped the seitan for the second time, I could feel that the structure was getting stronger as it cooked. I will report when I attempt this recipe with a different vital gluten. The house smells delicious though!
  • Jane L
    Jane L
    This recipe became one of our household faves during the Plant-Based Pro class. Now, I've made it more than a few times and recently took it to a dinner party where not everyone is plant-based and everyone really loved it. I use the leftovers on sandwiches. :)
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Happy to hear! Thanks for the feedback. ~Ken
  • Junie O
    Junie O
    What can I use instead of wine?
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Junie - The wine does add an important flavor element, but you could use a good stock with few splashes of a good red wine vinegar (or other vinegar) for acidity and brightness and then some juice or sweetener to balance it and add some fruity notes. If that's too much to balance, just use a flavorful stock and some apple juice for sweetness. ~Ken
  • Patricia M
    Patricia M
    Hi. I was wondering how long the BBQ sauce will last in the refrigerator or if it can be frozen. Thank You
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Patricia- It's certainly freezable (in small batch) or you can keep it in the fridge for about a week. ~Ken
  • Richard D
    Richard D
    I make VWG products 1 to 3 times per week. I have a round of about 20 recipes that I pick from. For the first time with this recipe I have produced a gummy product. Hard to cut and the cuts tend to stick together. Never seems to be fully chewed. I love the flavor, but not the texture.The only way I can use the product is to grind into small pieces and, by hand, separate the sticky mass into small pieces and fry until it is no longer sticky (about 10 mins) To be sure there was not something I did when preparing this dish, I repeated it with the same result. Assuming it wasn't fully cooked, I added about 30 minutes cooking time the third try. Still sticky and gummy FWIW, I am using Royal Product Red Lion VWG.. Any suggestions?
  • Chad S Rouxbe Staff
    Chad S
    Hi Richard, This is the first time we have heard of this dish being gummy, chewy has been some feedback which some factors would give this a finished softer and chewy texture. Given you are familiar with VWG and you cooked longer I want to dig in a bit more if these factors were all considered so we can trouble shoot this issue. Here are some common reasons: - If too much liquid was added to the dry batch to form the dough will result in a chewy product. The texture before baking should still be very tough and not able to tear apart easily, as the video suggests. - If too much liquid is added to braise when cooking the seitan. In the instructions we suggest using most but not all the liquid to braise in, this could be just poured up to the top of the seitan and not fully covering it, if too much liquid is used then the final dish will be quite soft since the seitan absorbs a good amount of it. You want to crisp the top of the brisket each time before you flip it rather than it being covered with liquid. By having some dry heat surround the top of the seitan during the cooking process will give a tougher and more dense, less chewy finished dish. - If the heat was not high enough or not cooked log enough. The seitan should have some char pieces around the edges and the liquid reduced to more of a glaze over the finished product. If none of these factors applies to your process then we can continue to trouble shoot. - Chad
  • Richard D
    Richard D
    Thanks for your response Chad! I have made the dish twice since my earlier note. The first time I repeated the recipe exactly as written. Again the product was gummy and hard to use. I have checked my oven temperature and it varied quite a lot (plus or minus 40 degrees). It averaged about 385. I think this is typical for a home oven. I am determined to solve problems--and my wife said this was one of her favorite flavors of the varieties of seitan I make. If this makes the wife happy . . . Again I read your reply carefully noting that the seitan was never submerged deeper than about 75% of its thickness. This morning I made the dish as written, but before putting the mass into the oven, I precooked it on a griddle set to 300 degrees. I divided the raw seitan into three pieces for easy handling and then cooked them for about 10 minutes on each side. From there put the pieces in the broth and baked per recipe. The final product has a good mouth feel, good flavor and "meaty" texture. I am happy now. So is my wife. By the way, Worcestershire sauce is NOT vegetarian. It is made from fermented fish. Most of the ingredients for the sauce are already present in the recipe, so I added 1/2 teaspoon each of tamarind paste and kelp powder. Next time will increase both to 1 teaspoon. Sorry for the long set of notes. I am a retired chemist. My university students told me I was a "whys" guy. Don't like not knowing--my favorite question is WHY?
  • Richard D
    Richard D
    Oops, I see that the recipe calls for vegan Worcestershire sauce.Sometimes I am reading challenged. Is there such a thing as a good vegan version? I've tried every brand I could find and all are poor imitations of the real thing.\--with a price tag suggesting gourmet quality. Been experimenting with making my own.
  • Ken R Rouxbe Staff
    Ken R
    Hi Richard- Thanks for the note... There are some good vegan Worcestershire sauces. I like the one from Annie's Naturals. You can also make it! I am happy that the recipe worked out, after you divided it. ~Ken
  • Lisa S
    Lisa S
    I've made this recipe a few times and it always turns out amazing! I grind dried porcini to make the mushroom powder and follow the video and recipe as written. When baking, it fills our house with the most delicious aromas. This afternoon, I sliced it thin to make BBQ brisket sandwiches on toasted multigrain buns and served it with a side of slaw - it was so, so good, everyone loved it! Thank you for the wonderful recipe!!!
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    Thank you Lisa, for sharing this wonderful note! And thank you for learning and cooking with Rouxbe! Chef Kirk
  • Rafaela M
    Rafaela M
    Could I use chipotle sauce in adobo instead of chipotle powder? I can't find it anywhere, and shipping alone costs 4x the price of the powder :/
  • Kirk B Rouxbe Staff
    Kirk B
    Hi Rafaela and yes indeed, chipotle sauce sounds like an amazing alternative! Enjoy and thanks for cooking with Rouxbe! Chef Kirk

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